Delivery and carryout services will be the only options in multiple states for weeks to come.

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As city, state, and federal officials continue to monitor and react to the COVID-19—or coronavirus—pandemic, governments are taking a variety of actions including limiting group events, closing schools, and suspending non-essential operations. On Sunday, multiple state governments announced closures of restaurants, bars, breweries, and other businesses. The CDC also released a new recommendation for avoiding or canceling any gather of 50 or more people in an effort to limit the spread of the virus.

Some national chain restaurants have taken action on their own, including Starbucks which, also on Sunday, announced it would be suspending in-store seating, converting all company-owned stores to carryout and delivery hubs only, and committing to temporarily closing stores in places like shopping malls and college campuses where large groups of people gather.

Some chefs and restaurateurs have made similar efforts of their own volition, including José Andrés, David Chang, and Danny Meyer, who closed all or most of their respective U.S. restaurants in recent days.

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Here are the states that have closed restaurants and bars due to coronavirus so far:

California

Gov. Gavin Newsom announced the closure of bars, wineries, breweries, and nightclubs indefinitely, and called for restaurants to operate at 50-percent capacity in accordance with social distancing practices. Both Newsom and Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti have also indicated full closure of restaurants could be possible in the coming days in the city and/or state.

Illinois

Gov. J.B. Pritzker called for a temporary cessation of dine-in service at restaurants and bars from Tuesday, March 17 through Monday, March 30. Delivery, drive-thru, carryout, and curbside pickup services would still be allowed for businesses to remain open.

Massachusetts

Gov. Charlie Baker placed a ban on dining in bars and restaurants in the state through Monday, April 6. Delivery, drive-thru, carryout, and curbside service would still be allowed.

Ohio

Gov. Mike DeWine closed all bars and restaurants in the state through Monday, March 30, effective Sunday, March 15 at 9 p.m. local time, with delivery and takeout services still allowed.

Pennsylvania

Gov. Tom Wolf put closures into effect in five counties—Allegheny, Bucks, Chester, Delaware, and Montgomery—beginning Monday, March 16 at 12:01 a.m. for two weeks.

Washington

Gov. Jay Inslee announced Sunday he would sign an emergency declaration suspending dine-in service at restaurants and bars on Monday, March 16 and effective through Tuesday, March 31. Takeout and delivery services are still allowed to continue.

Some cities are also taking action as well:

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced on Sunday night that he intended to suspend service at bars and restaurants in the city indefinitely starting Tuesday, March 17, after initially limiting them to 50-percent capacity, despite many social media posts showing crowded bars and brunch spots over the weekend. Washington, D.C. also instituted a ban on bar seating and service to standing customers, with a maximum of six persons per seated table and a minimum of six feet between tables, and shut down nightclubs completely. The city of Hoboken, New Jersey instituted a 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew and asked restaurants to transition to delivery and takeout.

In the last week, entire countries, including Italy and Spain, have gone on lockdown and shuttered all nonessential businesses as the number of infected persons in each nation has continued to grow.

This article will be updated as more information becomes available.

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