Marie Viljoen, Freelance Writer
Marie Viljoen, Freelance Writer

Marie Viljoen

Marie is a freelance writer for MarthaStewart.com.
This mixology technique is used for classics like the mint julep and mojito, and is very popular for making low- or no-ABV drinks.
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This favorite summer food has several identities, but only one is official.
Brilliantly green, a bowl of peas is a delightful thing. After a pat of butter and a shower of mint, all you really need to enjoy them is a spoon. Since they are so simple to prepare, it's easy to forget that there are more ways to use peas than the reflexive drop-and-boil. To honor the familiar legume, we've collected our best recipes for peas. Much as we love frozen peas (they're always in season!), each year we wait for spring when fresh peas come into season. Peas have strong qualities in terms of their ingredient game. Their iconic color adds instant vibrance to any dish. Their famed sweetness is a contrast for neutral, tart, or herbal flavors. And their distinctive pea-texture—soft after an initial pop—makes them as good intact as they are smooshed. Finally, they are so easy to prepare: Cooked in minutes, peas come to the rescue when time is tight. And those are the so-called English peas, whose pods we discard. Fresh sugar snap peas, with their flattened, edible pods and tiny green pearls inside, are another delicacy. Snap peas are a tonic in any dish that needs a quick fix: risotto, pasta, and bruschetta are brought to life by their emerald freshness. And peas have other secrets up their green sleeves: Their edible tendrils and young leaves are a delicious bonus, adding crunch and whimsy wherever they land. If you grow your own, pea shoots are a cut-and-come again pleasure. If you're ready to enjoy in-season English peas, sugar snaps, snow peas, and even pea shoots, these recipes are where you'll want to start.
Including all the delicious reasons to use this mushroom variety.
Bourbon and other American whiskeys are marvelously adaptable liquors for the home mixologist, as this collection of bourbon and whiskey cocktail recipes proves. These spirit cousins—bourbon is a whiskey, while not all whiskeys are bourbon—are self-assured enough to sip before or after dinner, and are suited to every season (mint juleps in May, anyone?). All whiskeys switch easily from mingling with the bright fruits and fresh herbs of summer to the warm spices, syrups, and ciders that suit autumn and winter. Plus, they are so versatile: With invigorating mint and a hint of sweetness, they become light and celebratory—add fall apples and some ginger, and the mood turns cozy. Ice whiskeys with abandon and they chill gracefully (while losing some alcoholic punch, which can be a good thing) without sacrificing their character. Heat bourbon with some honey-butter or coffee, and it's easy to feel like there is nothing better to sip on during a cold night. To enjoy these spirits, discover our best bourbon and whiskey cocktails—and a few fresh ideas that will make you inspired to whip up a drink this evening.
The smooth, easy-to-quaff liquor plays well in classic drinks like martinis and vodka tonics, as well as more elaborate newfangled cocktails. Here are our favorite recipes.
How to choose the freshest pods and keep them fresh till you cook them.
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If you're intimidated by its slippery reputation, we've got strategies for you.
Savor them on the half-shell with mignonette and other sauces. Try them grilled, roasted, in oyster stew, dip, and in classic recipes like oysters Rockfeller.
How to choose the freshest pods and keep them fresh till you cook them.
If you're intimidated by its slippery reputation, we've got strategies for you.
Savor them on the half-shell with mignonette and other sauces. Try them grilled, roasted, in oyster stew, dip, and in classic recipes like oysters Rockfeller.
Get past the spiky tips of artichokes, and you'll find that these leafy, mild-flavored vegetables are downright delicious. For inspiration, we've rounded up our best artichoke recipes—dishes so good they'll become springtime staples in your household.
Artichokes may look intimidating but with our expert advice, it's simple to steam, braise, or roast this delightful spring delicacy.
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Putting produce into the icebox when it should be left out (and vice versa) will spoil your Farmers Market finds.
Carrots make great snacks and add a sweet, earthy taste to soups, salads, and desserts. In fact, they just might be the perfect vegetable. Here, our favorite recipes starring the versatile carrot.
Plus, we're sharing what to look for when you're choosing cherries at the store or farmers' market.
We're rarely fans of single-use gadgets, but a cherry pitter is what you need. Don't have one? Luckily, there are other options.
Okra is a good source of fiber, minerals, and vitamins. Best of all, it's easy to prepare and, as our recipes go to show, entirely delicious.
Consider this your ultimate guide to enjoying this lovely purple fruit.
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Whether you want a green fruit for savory recipes or a ripe one for sweet dishes, we'll guide you towards papaya bliss.
This distinctive fungi has a range of health benefits, but we're all about its unique taste and texture.
You might also know it as the king trumpet as this mushroom has a range of names.
Nutty and chewy, farro plays well with strong ingredients like kale, beets, and salty cheese. This versatile grain also wins as part of a grain salad, a side dish to accompany meaty entrées, and even in the form of a breakfast bowl.
This beautiful, delicious, and nutritious fungus is widely available and worth trying.
No matter the season, occasion, or type of recipe you want to make, the large, meaty portobello mushroom is always a good choice. Here, you'll find our very best portobello mushroom recipes ranging from burgers and pizzas to stuffing and stew.
It's become a popular vegan-friendly meat alternative.