Because a beef chuck roast has lots of connective tissue, long, slow cooking turns the meat juicy and almost satiny in texture. In fact, it's reason alone to own a slow cooker.

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Ingredients

Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Slow-Cooker Method
  • In a 5-to-6-quart slow cooker, combine beef, garlic, oregano, rosemary, and broth. Season with salt and pepper. Cover and cook on high until beef is tender and can be pulled apart with a fork, 6 to 7 hours.

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Oven Method
  • Preheat oven to 275 degrees. In a large Dutch oven, combine beef, garlic, oregano, rosemary, and broth. Season with salt and pepper. Cover and cook until beef is tender and can be pulled apart with a fork, 5 to 6 hours.

Instructions Checklist
Instructions Checklist
To Serve
  • With a slotted spoon, transfer beef to a large bowl; with two forks, shred beef, discarding fat. Moisten beef with 1 cup cooking liquid; reserve remaining liquid. Refrigerate leftover beef in an airtight container, up to 5 days.

Cook's Notes

Serving Ideas

Make sandwiches: Top with red onion and mayonnaise mixed with horseradish. Use reserved cooking liquid for dipping.

Mix beef with short pasta, adding more cooking liquid if needed.

Serve with rice or mashed potatoes.

Reviews (1)

243 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 44
  • 4 star values: 81
  • 3 star values: 76
  • 2 star values: 34
  • 1 star values: 8
Rating: 4 stars
10/15/2019
I make beef pot roast and shred it for later fairly often. I usually use center-cut round or eye of round because the fibers are longer. I shred it one fiber at a time. I separate the fiber and discard the connective tissue, silverskin, or fat. It takes a little longer, but after you’re done, you don’t even have to look at it again. I use it for quesadillas, enchiladas, and my favorite—as a topping for spaghetti or similar pasta. For pasta, I just warm it up and crisp it very slightly with decent butter and put it on top of the pasta and tomato sauce. It will keep about 5-7 days in the refrigerator. Chuck is fine, sirloin is fine. I just prefer the long, one touch and done, fibers of a good round roast.