Depending on the property and your personal preferences, it might be totally fine.

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It's not uncommon that a wedding venue will host multiple events throughout the weekend, and some even host two or more weddings on the same day or time slot as your ceremony and reception. This is especially common when it comes to hotels or other large properties with multiple event spaces. Whether or not it's a big deal largely dependent on the layout of your venue and how they manage simultaneous events. Before you sign on the dotted line with a wedding venue that lacks exclusivity, here are a few dos and don'ts to keep in mind.

Don't view it as a deal breaker.

Wedding planner Marilyn Speight of Just a Little Ditty says, "It's definitely not a deal breaker if the venue is [designed] to host multiple events well. Most hotels or clubs that do this well have their event spaces separated by wings or floors so each event will have exclusive use of their area. Other multi-use event spaces have their same-day parties on different areas of the property completely to ensure privacy. As long as the events are happening far enough away from each other so that issues with access, directions, parking, acoustics, service, and so forth are able to be avoided, go for it!"

Do get as much detail as possible in advance.

Before you even sign your contract, you should be asking the right questions to find out how multiple events are managed at your venue. Will your guests see the other guests at all? Will there be a way to completely privatize your space so no guests are confused about which event is which? Where will guests for each event enter? Will both events have shuttles? If so, what will prevent your guests from getting in the wrong ones? When it comes down to the finer details, you need to know exactly what you're getting into so you can coordinate and prepare accordingly.

Don't make any assumptions.

Asking the right questions is a great way to start the conversation with your venue about how they manage making simultaneous events feel separate. The problem is that many couples forget to ask this critical question when they're signing their initial contract and may not even realize that their venue could host more than one event at a time. Just because your venue is small, remote, or easygoing doesn't guarantee exclusivity, so be sure to clarify all of the finer details.

Do consider a buyout if you're concerned about privacy.

Speight says, "Every venue is different, and often you are at the mercy of your contract, but one way to prevent additional events on your wedding day is to buyout the property." For the sake of your budget, it may be helpful to keep in mind that private use of your venue can extend beyond just the reception space and into the venue's hotel or public spaces as well. So, while a buyout may be a great solution for privacy, it may come with a few additional commitments for the host.

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