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They're oh so convenient.

By Victoria Spencer
April 23, 2020
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canned wine on outdoor counter beside food
Credit: Courtesy of Lubanzi

Where it was once reserved for drinking at picnics or on the beach, canned wine has now taken off as one of the best ways to enjoy a glass of your favorite vino when you're in quarantine by yourself (or with beer drinkers, non wine drinkers, or even wine drinkers who just don't like the same wine you do). Sure, you can open a bottle and have one glass a night, storing the remainder away for another evening; the wine will last, but there's no denying the fact that canned wine is just so convenient. Another reason to consider switching to the canned stuff? Some canned wine companies have mix and match packs, which allow for drinking exploration. Plus, cans are better for the environment than glass. They are lighter to ship, need less packing material, and are easier to recycle.

You won't be surprised to learn that canned wine is sold in wine and liquor stores, but you might not realize that some can be found at major national retailers, including Target and Walmart. But the most reliable way to buy canned wine at this very moment is, like most things, to order it online direct from the source. Canned wine delivered to your door might just be the ultimate in convenience! Not sure where to start when it comes to shopping for canned wine? There are a number of tasty, high-quality options on the market, and as this packaging type becomes more popular, the options will only continue to get better and better. To help you navigate this increasingly crowded category, we're sharing some of our favorite canned wines here.

Rosè for the Win

A non-scientific survey of canned wine suggests that rosé, along with sparkling, is the top category in canned wine. Maybe that's because summer and rosé are so synonymous. Whatever the reason, there are a lot of tasty rosés in cans. We like the easy-going organically grown rosé from Bonterra ($17.99 for four, bonterra.com) and the light, refreshing rosé from canned wine pioneers Underwood ($28 for four, unionwinecompany.com). The syrah from Brick & Mortar ($8 per can, brickandmortarwines.com) is also delicious.

White for Summer (or Anytime)

Try Lubanzi's chenin blanc ($30 for four, lubanzi.com) for a deliciously crisp and creamy introduction to South African wine. It's also fair trade certified. Other canned white wines we like: Sauvignon blanc from House Wine ($32 for six, originalhousewine.com) and Bonterra's sauvignon blanc ($17.99 for four, bonterra.com). For a perfect summer white, we recommend the dry riesling from Sans Wine Co. ($45 for three, sans-wine-co.com), who offer organic wines in cans from single California vineyards.

Don't Overlook Red Wine in Cans

There are some reds that fit the summer sipping profile of canned wine. The pinot noir from Underwood ($28 for four, unionwinecompany.com) is an old favorite. Sans Wine Co. has quality canned zinfandel ($30 for three, sans-wine-co.com) and a fresh, lively carbonic carignan ($36 for three, sans-wine-co.com) that shouldn't be overlooked. Bridge Lane from New York's Long Island has a red blend just right for the campfire or the couch ($34 for four, liebcellars.com). Last but not least, Sans also has cabernet sauvignon in cans ($75 for three, sans-wine-co.com) for anyone looking for a not-so-summery red in a portable package.

A Special Shout Out to Canned Sparkling Wine

While you could open a bottle of wine and have a glass tonight, another tomorrow, and finish it the day after, opening a bottle of prosecco or cava seems way too much to consider if you're quarantining alone. Sure, you could use the leftover wine for risotto buying canned is so much more sensible. Have a can of sparkling rosé on Friday and a can of prosecco on Saturday. Fresh, lively bubbles and no commitment.

Try the easy-to-quaff, frizzante-style sparkling white from Bridge Lane ($34 for four, liebcellars.com), the Brut Bubbles from House Wine ($45 for 12, originalhousewine.com), or the easy-to-find in stores sparkling white from 14 Hands ($35.94 for six, 14hands.com). The bright, fresh sparkling California rosé from Nomikai ($47.88 for 12, drinknomikai.com) should not be missed, nor should the lightly dry sparkling rosé from Italy that New York City sommelier Jordan Salcito offers in her Ramona brand ($15.99 for four, drinkramona.com).

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