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Ciabatta

Recipe photo courtesy of ANNA WILLIAMS

Stuff this homemade Italian bread with cured meats and cheeses, or simply dip it in olive oil.

Source: Martha Stewart Living, January 2008
Yield

Ingredients

For the Starter

For the Dough

Directions

Cook's Notes

The amount of water needed in this recipe will vary according to the temperature and humidity of your kitchen. On a cool, dry day you may need up to 7 ounces of water in step 2 to create a sticky dough. (It should cling to the bowl and look craggy.) Don't worry if the mixture feels too wet and loose when you begin kneading -- the flour will absorb the water as you stretch and fold the dough.

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21
  • Eliah Golan
    7 AUG, 2013
    Mi twin sister made it and it was amazing!! we turned it to garlic bread which we served with an amazing homamde tomato soup, we had to make two batches, one to taste (we couldn't stop eating it) and a second batch for dinner.
    Reply
  • SamarBar
    19 JUN, 2009
    I had the best roll of bread in my last visit to NY, Its the best memory I had from the USA, a rosemary bread from Zabarz, crunchy crust, gooey and bounces in the inside, used to eat it with olive oil EV, muuum, please anybody can get me the recipe
    Reply
  • sdavisblue
    20 MAY, 2008
    Ginger is correct, timing is all important when making dough. Check out the no-knead rosemary and lemon bread recipe. That recipe calls for an 18 hour rise and then an additional 2 hour rise but well worth the wait. If you don't autolyse pizza dough, you will not get the light airy crust that is so desirable in a good pizza crust. Happy waiting!
    Reply
  • GingerRichins
    20 JAN, 2008
    Mary, When making and using a starter for bread, it does require that amount of time. The time is necessary for developing the yeast, texture and flavor. Well worth it. I have found that among all the other components, patience is just as important in making good bread Ginger
    Reply
  • GingerRichins
    20 JAN, 2008
    Mary, When making and using a starter for bread, it does require that amount of time. The time is necessary for developing the yeast, texture and flavor. Well worth it. I have found that among all the other components, patience is just as important in making good bread Ginger
    Reply
  • maryestherc
    18 JAN, 2008
    Does this really take 12 to 15 hours to rise? I hope that is a type.
    Reply

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