Rating: 3.64 stars
630 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 158
  • 4 star values: 215
  • 3 star values: 156
  • 2 star values: 75
  • 1 star values: 26

Brined to retain moisture, then basted with butter and wine while roasting, this turkey, the centerpiece of the Thanksgiving meal, is golden and juicy. The bird is brined for 24 hours, so leave plenty of time for this recipe. If you don't brine yours, skip steps one and two.

Advertisement

Ingredients

Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Put salt, sugar, onions, leeks, carrots, celery, bay leaves, thyme, parsley, peppercorns, and 10 cups water in a large stockpot. Bring to a boil, stirring until salt and sugar have dissolved. Remove from heat; let brine cool completely.

    Advertisement
  • Add turkey, breast first, to the brine. Cover; refrigerate 24 hours. Remove from brine; pat dry with paper towels. Let stand at room temperature 2 hours.

  • Preheat oven to 425 degrees, with rack in lowest position. Stir together melted butter and wine in a medium bowl. Fold a very large piece of cheesecloth into quarters so that it is large enough to cover breast and halfway down sides of turkey. Immerse cloth in butter mixture; let soak.

  • Place turkey, breast side up, on a rack set in a roasting pan. Fold wing tips under turkey. Sprinkle 1 teaspoon each salt and pepper inside turkey. Loosely fill body and neck cavities with stuffing. Tie legs together with kitchen twine. Fold neck flap under; secure with toothpicks. Rub turkey all over with softened butter; season with salt and pepper.

  • Remove cheesecloth from butter mixture, squeezing gently into bowl. Reserve butter mixture for brushing. Lay cheesecloth over turkey. Place turkey, legs first, in oven. Roast 30 minutes. Brush cheesecloth and exposed turkey with butter mixture. Reduce temperature to 350 degrees. Roast, brushing every 30 minutes, 2 1/2 hours more; cover with foil if browning too quickly. If making gravy, add giblets and neck to pan 1 1/2 hours after reducing temperature; roast 30 minutes, and reserve.

  • Discard cheesecloth; rotate pan. Baste turkey with pan juices. Roast, rotating pan halfway through, until skin is golden brown and an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the thigh registers 180 degrees and stuffing reaches 165 degrees, about 1 hour. Transfer to a platter. Set pan with drippings aside for gravy. Let turkey stand at room temperature at least 30 minutes. Garnish, if desired.

Cook's Notes

The U.S. Department of Agriculture recommends cooking the turkey until the thickest part of the thigh registers 180 degrees. For a moister bird, we cooked ours to 165 degrees; it will continue to cook outside the oven as it rests.

Martha made this recipe on Cooking School episode 406.

Reviews (117)

630 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 158
  • 4 star values: 215
  • 3 star values: 156
  • 2 star values: 75
  • 1 star values: 26
Rating: 5 stars
11/03/2019
I've used this exact recipe every Thanksgiving for the past 5 years. It comes out perfect every single time. I usually skip the brining part as most store-bought turkeys come pre-brined and I find it makes it way too salty to basically double brine. Other than that, I would not change a thing.
Rating: 5 stars
11/23/2018
This was my first time making a turkey (2018), I used the recipe, minus the leeks and due to a smaller turkey (14lbs), I cut back on the amount of salt & sugar. To make sure the brine was good and not to salty, I tasted a small sample and it was good. For those that live in the North East, if you don't have space in your fridge, as I read from some of the post; I placed the turkey in the bag with the brine and placed it outside on my balcony for 24 hours.
Rating: 5 stars
11/22/2018
I've been using this recipe since 2003. This brine works great, although I do add a head garlic cut in half, skin and all and lemon cut in half. The cheesecloth is my go to method whether we make a whole turkey or do a deconstructed turkey --(good for a small party) every part cooks as it should because you remove the breast from the oven when its done and leave the dark meat to cook up. The cheesecloth does give the turkey a lovely deep brown color.
Advertisement
Rating: 1 stars
11/25/2017
I prepared the brine precisely as directed, soaked the expensive organic free-range turkey exactly as directed, and roasted the bird as directed by the recipe. The result was a beautifully-browned, moist, but INEDIBLE, extremely over-salted disaster. None of my nine dinner guests could get past the first bite or two because of the mouth-burning saltiness. (None of us arere on no-salt or low-salt diets, and none of us are salt-averse.) I trusted the Martha Stewart name, but will never do so again.
Rating: 5 stars
11/24/2017
This worked really well. The turkey was very tender and juicy. Since I have to eat Paleo, I made a different stuffing, but everything turned out really well. The cheese cloth seemed to be the perfect method for basting and keeping it from drying out. This is be my next year's method.
Rating: 2 stars
11/15/2017
love the receip
Advertisement
Rating: Unrated
11/23/2014
Brining is the best thing that ever happened to turkey. I have used this method since Martha's initial presentation with consistently excellent results. Dry the brined bird very, very well to insure a crisp golden skin. I completely submerge frozen bird in ice cold (ICE COLD) brine in an ice chest 7 days before Thanksgiving. I add ice daily to maintain a temperature of 35 - 40 degrees. Cavity is stuffed with onion, garlic, citrus and herbs. Perfect every time!
Rating: Unrated
11/04/2014
Let me start this review by saying that I've never brined a turkey and probably never will. However (and that's a very large "but), I have used this recipe beginning at Step 3 for well over 15 years. Ever since I made my first Martha Stewart turkey, my family (who would rather have passed on the turkey) requests that I make this one. It's the best turkey ever. I also make Ina's cornbread stuffing. My gravy is Martha's using winter vegetables (lots of work but worth the effort).
Rating: Unrated
11/30/2013
Alton Brown disagrees inasmuch as he brines the whole turkey, not just the breast. It turns out just fine brining the whole thing.
Rating: Unrated
12/01/2012
I used this recipe last Christmas on the first turkey I have ever cooked. I bought an 18 lb. turkey and followed the recipe to a "T". It turned out moist and delicious! My family has requested that I make it again this Christmas. The drippings make into a fantastic gravy too!
Rating: Unrated
11/25/2012
My first time brining a turkey and it turned out superb! The recipe only calls for 10 cups of water because the only part of the turkey that is submerged is the breast (the water does not cover the entire bird). Remember to use a fresh turkey with no additives, the frozen birds often have salty injections in them. Also remember to use kosher salt (not table). I used a 14 pound bird and took the measurements down proportionately. It only took 2 hours and 45 minutes, but I did not stuff it.
Rating: Unrated
11/23/2012
This was the first year for me to cook the turkey. I followed this recipe to a "T" and it turned out perfectly. Everyone helped themselves to seconds. That's the best compliment ever!!
Rating: Unrated
11/22/2012
Nov 2012: There must be missing ingredients to this recipe. I used the amount of water (10 c.) and it barely covered 1/4 of the bird (20 lb turkey). I checked another brined turkey recipe in Martha's 2007 magazine (p. 88) and it says 7 quarts of water + a bottle of wine. The bird is now covered up to the top of the legs.
Rating: Unrated
11/20/2012
This recipe has made me famous for the best turkey in the family. I have been making it for years now. I have modified it somewhat, though. I found the excessive amount of sugar impacted the flavor of the gravy, so I reduced the amount by about half. Otherwise, make as directed. It is WORTH clearing space in the fridge to brine the bird. Thanks, Martha!
Rating: Unrated
11/18/2012
@CaliJordan: I never brined the turkey and it always turned out great. You can skip that step if you want and omit those ingredients. Also to everyone else, didn't the recipe used to call for a bottle of white wine?
Rating: Unrated
11/17/2012
help! i used this receipe a LONG time ago, but i don't remember brining and I'm not sure I have fridge space (tho love the garbage bag idea!). So- if I don't brine, do I use the brine ingredients as a rub for the turkey? (those that make sense), or just season it w/the usual salt, pepper, thyme, sage, etc, then use the butter & wine to baste? I remember this being amazing, but it's been 15 years since doing Thanksgiving so a bit rusty! Thank you for any tips & help!!! and Happy Thanksgiving!
Rating: Unrated
11/14/2012
Hands down, this is the best turkey brine recipe ever. I have been using this for the past 6 years and I am now famous for my perfect turkey. Even my strict vegetarian friends eat this turkey, its that good!
Rating: Unrated
11/14/2012
Hands down, this is the best turkey brine recipe ever. I have been using this for the past 6 years and I am now famous for my perfect turkey. Even my strict vegetarian friends eat this turkey, its that good!
Rating: Unrated
11/26/2011
This is a fabulous and virtually fool-proof recipe. While brining isn't necessary it does make a big difference. I cut the salt in half but unfortunately usually double the wine and butter for basting (makes for even better gravy).
Rating: Unrated
11/24/2011
I was hesitant in trying a new way to cook my turkey, but I have to say this method is awesome! I have never seen a more beautiful colored bird and the meat, even the breast, was soooo moist and delicious. I recommend this method to everyone.
Rating: 5 stars
11/19/2011
We LOVE this recipe --and we do NOT brine our turkey. It does make a big difference if I can get a HW turkey, but even if I can't, this recipe makes any turkey the best it can be, and it is not at all complicated if you skip the brining. I end up using the entire bottle of wine and just keep adding butter to keep the ratio right, and I add WS turkey gravy base to the gravy and it's the BEST turkey ever!
Rating: 5 stars
11/18/2011
I have used this recipe for many years. I don't bine it because it becomes too salty and it really isn't necessary. (I used this recipe before brining was a fad.). I spent years looking for a roast turkey recipe that didn't come out dry and this is it - I promise.
Rating: 4 stars
04/23/2011
Cut the salt in 1/2 and we LOVE LOVE this recipe! Have used it for 3 years and it is beautiful and gets raves every time. It's worth every minute of effort!
Rating: Unrated
11/29/2010
This was my first time brining a turkey and this recipe was much too salty. I would recommend reducing the salt and brining time as well as rinsing the turkey thoroughly before cooking!
Rating: Unrated
11/25/2010
OMG, what a wonderful turkey. We just finished dinner and everyone raved over the turkey. Thanks for the great recipe!
Rating: Unrated
11/25/2010
This is my first time brining the turkey and it is sitting in a tightened garbage bag (didn't have a pot big enough) in the refrigerator. It is 23 lbs and I am not stuffing it. More cooking time because it's bigger? Or less cooking time because it's not stuffed?
Rating: Unrated
11/24/2010
@Mommyto1, I'm not Martha Stewart but I've been brining for years. I've read or watched so many cooking shows and thy all offer different times for brining. I have heard anywhere from 8hrs to 48hrs but 24 hours seems to be the norm. My 1st year brining, i had a 14lb bird and I brined it for 2.5 days. I have heard that you shouldn't brine that long because it starts to pickle (That's what Tyler Florence said). Well, that was the best turkey I had thus far;) Don't shorten your time.
Rating: Unrated
11/24/2010
I'm not stuffing my bird. Do I need to 'sew' it together and/or adjust cooking time?
Rating: Unrated
11/24/2010
do i need to shorten the brine time for a smaller bird?
Rating: Unrated
11/23/2010
Excellent brine. For a bit more festive flavor, I added 5 cloves and 3 cinnamon sticks. It gave it a warm and spicy aroma. Can't wait until Christmas. Martha's Beef Wellington has become a family tradition.
Rating: Unrated
11/23/2010
@Melanie04. I am also making a 13 pound turkey and my brine is 1.5 cups of salt and 3/4 cups of sugar. Good Luck!!
Rating: Unrated
11/23/2010
@Chips51. I'm not Martha Stewart but I've been brining for years. You absolutely MUST rinse the turkey very well when your done brining to rinse off the bacteria. It won't reverse the brining process by rinsing it really well. Good luck to you:)
Rating: Unrated
11/23/2010
@Doughboy2, I'm not Martha Stewart but if you don't want to use wine, Apple Cider should be a great alternative.
Rating: Unrated
11/23/2010
Help. I've cooked my 20 lb turkeys this way for several years. This year, I am cooking an 11 lb turkey. How long should I cook this smaller bird?
Rating: Unrated
11/23/2010
What non-alcoholic alternative to the white wine? Is apple juice okay?
Rating: Unrated
11/22/2010
Should the turkey be rinsed when removed from brine?
Rating: Unrated
11/22/2010
I cooked my turkey this way last year and it was fabulous! I did add a little twist by using Emeril's brine as well. http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emeril-lagasse/brined-and-roasted-turkey-recipe/index.html
Rating: Unrated
11/22/2010
I'm thinking of using this recipe this year - I've never brined a turkey (or anything for that matter)! I am only using a 12 lb turkey though. I know to only brine for 12 hours, but does anyone know if I need to reduce the amount of salt and other seasonings? I don't want my bird to turn out too salty! Thanks :)
Rating: Unrated
11/22/2010
I've never done the brine, but i have cooked this turkey this way for the Last 14 years, its the best, moist and beauitful. I make my dressing with the dripping and cornbread mixture, its my grandmothers. Thank You Martha!!!! MY FAMILY THANKS YOU!!!! HAPPY THANKSGIVING...........
Rating: Unrated
11/22/2010
I've never done the brine, but i have cooked this turkey this way for the Last 14 years, its the best, moist and beauitful. I make my dressing with the dripping and cornbread mixture, its my grandmothers. Thank You Martha!!!! MY FAMILY THANKS YOU!!!! HAPPY THANKSGIVING...........
Rating: Unrated
11/19/2010
If you use a fresh, organic turkey will the brine make it too salty? I made this recipe last year and it was perfect but I used a frozen turkey.
Rating: Unrated
11/19/2010
If you use a fresh, organic turkey will the brine make it too salty? I made this recipe last year and it was perfect but I used a frozen turkey.
Rating: Unrated
11/16/2010
This will be the 6th year that I have made this turkey and it is out of this world! The butter mixture I have used is wine (I use Golden Bunches from Ferrante) and butter and I usually make twice the recipe to have plenty to baste with. the recipe tells you when to remove the cheescloth. It's towards the end. Make sure to keep it soaking, if not it will dry out and stick to the skin.
Rating: Unrated
11/16/2010
To the person that said it was salty, did you use a fresh turkey that had never been brined? Frozen turkeys are typically already soaked in a salt water bath.
Rating: Unrated
11/15/2010
What is the butter mixture you use to soak the cheese cloth? Also, is it white wine and does it matter which kind?
Rating: Unrated
11/13/2010
I made this for my In-laws, the first Thanksgiving my husband and I were married. My Mother-in-law and my overly, critical sister-in-law (he he he) were both very impressed. All my sister-in-law kept saying, was that it was the PRETTIEST turkey she had ever seen. (It was the prettiest I had ever seen , too!) Since then, my husband and I have added 2 little boys to the family, and we can't imagine Thangiving without what we call, 'Martha's Turkey'! Thanks Martha.
Rating: Unrated
11/11/2010
What is the butter mixture you used to soak the cheese cloth? When do you remove the cheese cloth? I don't stuff my bird, I put it in a casserole, how long should I cook say a 20 lb. bird?
Rating: Unrated
11/10/2010
I have cooked this turkey for 10 years and it always turns out great and not salty like someone else said. I love this recipe it is quick and tast great. Thank you Martha.
Rating: Unrated
11/02/2010
This was delicious. I add a golden roasted flax and chia blend to my stuffing called fitflax (http://www.fitflax.com) for added taste, fiber and texture. Fitflax is low cal and low carb and besides being yummy is loaded with fiber, Omega 3's and antioxidants. I also make my gravy without using butter.
Rating: Unrated
11/02/2010
This was HORRIBLE! The meat was wet to the point of excess... it was WATERLOGGED! Also, EXTREMELY SALTY to the point of being INEDIBLE, not to mention a hypertensive crisis! This turkey was useless: the meat and stuffing were so extremely salty that threw the entire thing in the garbage. Against my better judgement I tried the showcase recipe for thanksgiving. A HUGE MISTAKE. The cheesecloth worked well so it looked great, too bad it will kill your guests with high blood pressure!
Rating: Unrated
09/20/2010
You don't have to baste it-if you want a great turkey Cook at 450 for 30 minutes turn down to 350-20pd turkey cooked to perfection in 3 hours do not open door-take out and let sit covered for an hour
Rating: Unrated
11/28/2009
After twenty years I tried something new the Martha Stewart cheesecloth turkey. It was fabulous. A beautiful golden brown and juicy. I was nervous about the short cooking time but it was the BEST
Rating: Unrated
11/28/2009
I never knew how dry my turkey was until I had this one!!! This is the BEST turkey I ever made and now, it is a family standard. Thanks Martha for never letting me down!!
Rating: Unrated
11/23/2009
Saludos a todos desde Puerto Rico. Quiero dejarles saber que la mejor receta del pavo es en fricas?ɬ
Rating: Unrated
11/23/2009
I've never done the brine, but everything else Ive been using for 3 years now and every time I pull the beautiful turkey from the oven, my guest oooh and ahhhh.... and it tastes as good as it looks. Juiciest turkey ever!
Rating: Unrated
11/23/2009
When is the cheescloth removed?
Rating: Unrated
11/19/2009
This looks really good! l love the plating food idea as well! There's several sites that I actually check out a lot for this thanksgiving. I found this site really helpful for thanksgiving menu. http://www.foodnetwork.com/thanksgiving-sides/package/index.html for turkey recipes http://www.cookturkey.net If you are thinking about frying your turkey, check out his post to learn what can go really wrong http://www.cookturkey.net/turkey-frying-tips/ Lastly, if you want to see some great photos of fo
Rating: Unrated
10/12/2009
Can I use a smaller Turkey?
Rating: Unrated
04/21/2009
I like it, thank you!
Rating: Unrated
12/26/2008
I agree with the above comment. I brined the turkey, and it ruined my stuffing and gravy, and made the turkey so salty I almost couldn't eat it. I'd just recommend using only 1-2 cups salt, 1-2 cups sugar to 8 cups water.
Rating: Unrated
12/09/2008
I love this recipie - but never did it with the brining step- until this year. WARNING: The directions incorrectly tell you to remove from brine and pat dry - -This is WRONG - You must rinse the bird in fresh water then dry - my gravy was ruined it was so salty you couldn't eat it!!!!!
Rating: Unrated
12/09/2008
I love this recipie - but never did it with the brining step- until this year. WARNING: The directions incorrectly tell you to remove from brine and pat dry - -This is WRONG - You must rinse the bird in fresh water then dry - my gravy was ruined it was so salty you couldn't eat it!!!!!
Rating: Unrated
12/09/2008
I love this recipie - but never did it with the brining step- until this year. WARNING: The directions incorrectly tell you to remove from brine and pat dry - -This is WRONG - You must rinse the bird in fresh water then dry - my gravy was ruined it was so salty you couldn't eat it!!!!!
Rating: Unrated
12/09/2008
I love this recipie - but never did it with the brining step- until this year. WARNING: The directions incorrectly tell you to remove from brine and pat dry - -This is WRONG - You must rinse the bird in fresh water then dry - my gravy was ruined it was so salty you couldn't eat it!!!!!
Rating: Unrated
12/09/2008
I love this recipie - but never did it with the brining step- until this year. WARNING: The directions incorrectly tell you to remove from brine and pat dry - -This is WRONG - You must rinse the birf in fresh water then dry - my gravy was ruined it was so salty you couldn't eat it!!!!!
Rating: Unrated
11/28/2008
It was fabulous, even the one who doesn't like turkey, loved it. Can I make it in a rotisserie?
Rating: Unrated
11/27/2008
Turkey was WAY too salty. Yesterday when I tried to see the comments they wouldn't come up...sure would have saved my turkey. Luckily the breast meat was juicy and tasty still and we only had four eating. The rest of the turkey was ruined.
Rating: Unrated
11/27/2008
LittlePistol, the turkey needs to come to room temperature so that it will cook evenly and in the recommended amount of time. The two hours to do this will not cause it to become a bacteria breeding ground, if you left it out for longer then yes, it could be trouble. Although, if your turkey is smaller than 18-20lbs go ahead and adjust the amount of time down. Happy Thanksgiving!!
Rating: Unrated
11/26/2008
Make sure your bird is not "pre-brined" or it will taste overly salty.
Rating: Unrated
11/26/2008
Im confused why we leave it at room temperature for two hours, wouldn't it attract all sorts of bacteria?
Rating: Unrated
11/26/2008
is this suppose to taste like pure salt!!!! and does it matter if the turkey is not completely covered in the brine... I don't have a large enough pot
Rating: Unrated
11/26/2008
Rubybell thank you so very much:-)
Rating: Unrated
11/26/2008
Kandicebest, A cheesecloth is a type of cloth used for cooking and (I think) making cheese, hence the name. I doubt you could make it yourself. ;-D It is found in the cooking gadget section of the grocery store or Walmart or Target. I have seen it recently with the other seasonal foods. It comes folded in a flat, 4x6ish size package. I think it is just a few dollars. Good luck!
Rating: Unrated
11/25/2008
what is a cheesecloth and can i make this myself?
Rating: Unrated
11/25/2008
A butterball is just fine, just trust the brine and soak it it for at least ten hours , twenty four would be better.
Rating: Unrated
11/24/2008
I'm an American living in Thailand, and am about to make my first turkey. All they sell here are Butterball turkeys (unfortunately). Do you still need to put these in a brine? Any advice is appreciated!
Rating: Unrated
11/24/2008
ive found that by not covering the turkey, you get a moisture and better tasting bird. I have learned over the last 20 years that turkey is best cooked with no lid, no foil over it. Cheescloth works well, as the recipe calls for one above.
Rating: Unrated
11/23/2008
A foil can be used yes, but do not cover the entire pan cover ONLY the turkey, you do not want steam cooking the turkey, steam will make your turkey DRY, just cover the turkey. :)
Rating: Unrated
11/23/2008
A foil can be used yes, but do not cover the entire pan cover ONLY the turkey, you do not want steam cooking the turkey, steam will make your turkey DRY, just cover the turkey. :)
Rating: Unrated
11/23/2008
thus it will give me a dark gravy...this is my taste, but if you want a white gravy just simmer the giblet without browning, and dont use any of the drippings (if they are dark in color). Have wonderful Thanksgiving
Rating: Unrated
11/23/2008
A dark (brown) gravy is what you need, a white gravy is not very appealing to the eye! when i make my giblet stock i put the giblet with the veggies in the oven and brown them then make the stock to acheive a dark stock thus will give me
Rating: Unrated
11/23/2008
Did you put all the drippings in a fat seperator and just used the fantastic juice? or you used the fat also to make the gravy? well, you should not use the fat (Butter) to the gravy, also dont use the liver to make the giblet stock that adds a weird taste to the gravy
Rating: Unrated
11/23/2008
Can foil be used instead of the cheesecloth to cover the turkey while roasting, as long as I baste?
Rating: Unrated
11/23/2008
I made this last year (my first turkey ever) and it turned out wonderfully! Very moist and delicious. The only thing I didn't like was the gravy. It tasted very greasy and was dark in color. Does anyone know why that might have happened? I brined this turkey according to the directions above and I'm wondering if that is why it tasted greasy. Any thoughts are welcomed.
Rating: Unrated
11/23/2008
No lid is needed. Just watch the internal temperature of the turkey for doneness. It will continue to rise 10 degrees after you take it out.
Rating: Unrated
11/22/2008
Does anyone know if I have to use a turkey pan lid to cover the turkey while in the oven or only the cheesecloth on top would be enough? Thanks a lot.
Rating: Unrated
11/22/2008
Does anyone know if I have to use a turkey pan lid to cover the turkey while in the oven or only the cheesecloth on top would be enough? Thanks a lot.
Rating: Unrated
11/22/2008
This is a dry brine, not wet. If you add liquid to make it a wet brine decrease the salt to total 1/2 cup per gallon of water or the turkey will be too salty.
Rating: Unrated
11/22/2008
I am unsure what to "brine" in. I have an All Clad stockpot which woudl be big enough for the turkey- but is the metal ok? Any feedback welcomed!!
Rating: Unrated
11/21/2008
I used this recipe last year and I have to say it was THE most delicious turkey I've had in my entire life! (I'm 50!) My kids were amazed that I made such an awesome meal :)
Rating: Unrated
11/21/2008
also, doesn't the turkey become too salty with this brining method? Thanks for your help.
Rating: Unrated
11/21/2008
also, doesn't the turkey become too salty with this brining method? Thanks for your help.
Rating: Unrated
11/21/2008
Does anyone know if I have to use a turkey pan lid to cover the turkey while in the oven or only the cheesecloth on top would be enough? Thanks a lot.
Rating: Unrated
11/17/2008
I have never brined the turkey and if I run out of the wine and butter mixture I just make more. The turkey has always turned out great. I just brush it on instead of using a baster. Oh and if you have dogs, put the cheesecloth in the trash outside away from the dogs...that cheesecloth is irrisistable to even the best trained dog.
Rating: Unrated
11/15/2008
could the brine for an 18-20 lb turkey work for a 12-14 lb turkey or would I have to adjust the ingredients?...need to make it right this time!! PLEASE HELP MARTHA OR ANYBODY!!!!!!
Rating: Unrated
11/14/2008
Made this recipe several times (no brining). 1st time-a mess using baster-oven cooled too much ea. time (took WAY longer to cook)
Rating: Unrated
11/13/2008
I have always been told not to leave poultry out for too long and 2 hours seems like a long time to leave uncooked turkey out. Is this safe to do?
Rating: Unrated
11/07/2008
I actually have a question with regard to the bottom of the turkey. For a few years I've cooked breast side up, but once the turkey was done, I could never have the bottom 100% cooked. The past two years I've started cooking the turkey bottom up for 1 hour, then breast side up for the remainder of the time. This helped, however, the bottom was still not 100% cooked. If anyone has any suggestions as to how I can get the bottom done I would greatly appreciate it. tdimella@optonline.net =)
Rating: Unrated