The same brine and spices are used for the cucumber, carrot, and beet variations, so it's easy to make a batch of one kind -- or one of each for a large crowd.

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Ingredients

For the Pickling Spices (Makes Enough for 1 Version)
For the Pickling Brine (Makes Enough for 1 Version)
For Cucumber Variation (Makes 3 Quarts)
For Carrot Variation (Makes 2 Quarts)
For Beet Variation (Makes 2 1/2 Quarts)

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • To make the cucumber variation: Wash and sterilize 3 quart-size jars. Toss cucumbers with 3 tablespoons salt, and place in a colander set over a bowl. Refrigerate for 1 to 2 hours. Drain, rinse, and drain again. Divide cucumbers, garlic, and dill among jars. Divide pickling spices (recipe above) among jars. Bring pickling brine ingredients (recipe above) and 2 teaspoons salt to a boil in a medium saucepan, and pour over cucumbers. Let stand until cool. Cover, and refrigerate.

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  • To make the carrot variation: Wash and sterilize 2 quart-size jars. Bring pickling brine ingredients (recipe above) and 1 tablespoon plus 1 1/2 teaspoons salt to a boil in a medium saucepan. Add carrots, and return to a boil. Divide carrots with liquid evenly between jars. Cut about a 2-inch slit into side of each chile. Divide chiles, garlic, and pickling spices (recipe above) evenly between jars. Let stand until cool. Cover, and refrigerate.

  • To make the beet variation: Wash and sterilize 2 quart-size jars and 1 half-quart-size jar. Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Wrap beets in parchment-lined foil. Bake until tender, about 1 hour. Let cool slightly, then rub off skins; discard. Cut beets into 3/4-inch-thick wedges, and divide evenly among jars. Divide ginger slices, orange peels, chile slices, and pickling spices (recipe above) evenly between jars. Bring pickling brine ingredients (recipe above) and 1 tablespoon plus 1 1/2 teaspoons salt to a boil in a medium saucepan, and pour over beets. Let stand until cool. Cover, and refrigerate.

Cook's Notes

Storage: Pickles can be kept, refrigerated, for up to 1 month.

Reviews (2)

49 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 12
  • 4 star values: 16
  • 3 star values: 15
  • 2 star values: 5
  • 1 star values: 1
Rating: Unrated
03/26/2012
During the broadcast, Calder question whether coriander was related to parsley. Lucinda seemed to say "no", which is true. But the answer deserved a better explanation: coriander (seeds) are from the leafy cilantro plant. (In fact in some European recipes, "cilantro leaves" are referred to as "coriander". So read carefully.)
Rating: Unrated
03/26/2012
During the broadcast, Calder question whether coriander was related to parsley. Lucinda seemed to say "no", which is true. But the answer deserved a better explanation: coriander (seeds) are from the leafy cilantro plant. (In fact in some European recipes, "cilantro leaves" are referred to as "coriander". So read carefully.)