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Candied ginger brings a sweet heat to these crisp, golden cookies, while lemon gives the glaze a distinct zing.

Source: Martha Stewart Living, June 2008
Yield

Ingredients

Directions

Cook's Notes

Drizzling the rounds just before serving ensures a shiny glaze and crisp cookies. For softer cookies, let the glaze set overnight. (The glaze's shimmer will dull.)

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  • anniequinn
    8 DEC, 2011
    The recipe in the magazine says roll out to 1/4 inch thick
    Reply
  • 27PurpleRoses
    30 JAN, 2011
    I don't think this reicpe is accurate enough.-- says to create 1" rolls then roll the dough out to 1"
    Reply
  • Anarie
    5 JUN, 2010
    Works well as a slice and bake log as PPs suggested. I also think 2T of vanilla is way too much. I loooove vanilla, but here it mutes the ginger. I did add ground ginger, and if I make these again I'll increase that to 1T or more. I ended up with 5 doz.
    Reply
  • Anarie
    5 JUN, 2010
    Works well as a slice
    Reply
  • Anarie
    5 JUN, 2010
    The dough is extremely soft because of all that melted butter. That's why you MUST chill it. Even then I think it would be soft to roll; I made a slice
    Reply
  • mykele
    4 APR, 2010
    kntzv, I owe everyone an apology, I do know better and cannot figure out my erring on this one...........I am a veteran at baking and cooking and really do know better....thank you for the reminder .....Mykele
    Reply
  • kritzv
    3 APR, 2010
    The problem is thinking that 1 T equals 1 oz. of butter. Actually 1 T = 1/2 oz of butter. 8 T of butter = 1/2 cup of butter = 4 oz of butter. Therefore 12 T of butter = 3/4 C = 6 oz of butter. This is one of the reasons pros bakers use weight measurements and not volume...Vic
    Reply
  • mykele
    3 APR, 2010
    Check again Ceege...8 oz. = 1/2 cup or one stick of butter. It takes 2 sticks for one cup. Read your wrapping paper again please. Mykele
    Reply
  • Ceege
    2 APR, 2010
    To Mykele 6 oz. is 3/4 cup. 8 oz. is 1 cup. 4 oz. is 1/2 cup. So in order to get the 3/4 cup of butter needed, you would use 1/2 and 1/4 cup. If you are actually using butter, all you need to do is count the number of tablespoons marked on the paper wrapping. You would need 1 1/2 sticks of butter for this recipe
    Reply
  • mykele
    2 APR, 2010
    Am I the only one who questions the butter quantity? half a cup is 8 ounces sooo 6 ounces is not 3/4 cup but 2 tablespoons less than half a cup or 6 ounces less 2 ounces of butter. No wonder you had sticky dough. The idea for freezing in ziplock bags is GREAT. thank you mykele
    Reply

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