New This Month

Chewy Chocolate-Gingerbread Cookies

Recipe photo courtesy of Joseph De Leo

A combination of fresh and ground ginger, molasses, and chunks of semisweet chocolate makes the cookies sophisticated enough for adults but chocolaty enough for children.

Source: Martha Stewart Living, December/January 1997
Yield

Ingredients

Directions

Similar Recipes

Reviews

5
4
3
2
1
589
How would you rate this recipe?
589
  • ButlerBub
    26 OCT, 2014
    If you like deep, earthy spices and a chewy texture, this is the perfect autumn/holiday cookie. Calls for 1/4 cup molasses; used to list 1/2 . I've always used 1/2 cup, and I get perfect results every time. If you roll the dough between your hands, forming a ball a little smaller than a golf ball, you don't need to weigh the dough or press down on it. Thanks to Martha and her team for this recipe. It's become a wonderful Fall-Christmas tradition, starting the first day the temps don't hit 60 :-)
    Reply
  • Eve Irvine
    26 JUN, 2014
    At Christmas I make tins of cookies for gifting and while I try different recipes annually, this one has been included every single time because it's absolutely the best. With the original recipe I found it slightly uncooked in the centre and always add an extra minute or two. I hadn't noticed the difference in molasses until reading the comments while they were in the oven but to get the right shape I've learned to roll dough that's been chilled overnight in my hands and flatten slightly. 10/10
    Reply
  • Elfenlady
    16 DEC, 2013
    I have made these cookies every year for my family and friends. they have become a Christmas staple. However this year, I again followed directions exactly, and they came out lighter in color and crunchy. I noticed that I was following a different recipe(I have two printed out) than normal, and this one calls for the 1/2 cup Molasses as opposed to the 1/4 cup Molasses. I would think the 1/2 cup would make them chewier rather than crunchy. Ugh. Im confused. I don't understand what happened
    Reply
  • Daniella Price Gonzalez
    12 DEC, 2013
    325ยบ conventional or Fan oven? Thanks!
    Reply
  • Marisa E
    10 DEC, 2013
    Can you freeze these cookies?
    Reply
  • MSModerator601
    28 NOV, 2013
    This now-classic recipe was originally published in the December 1996/January 1997 issue of MSL. Both molasses amounts (1/2 cup or 1/4 cup) are correct: it's a matter of personal taste. More molasses means a moister, chewier cookie - and more molasses flavor. This information won't settle the debate - but we hope it clears up the confusion!
    Reply
  • MS11906619
    25 NOV, 2013
    I'm going to weigh in on the 1/2 cup molasses team...I just found this recipe in my "Holiday Cookies Special Edition" from 12/2001, perhaps the original publication. It says 1/2 cup molasses. However, I have never made the cookies - I'll find out today which measurement is correct!
    Reply
  • a_renee
    24 NOV, 2013
    The recipe is SUPPOSED to be 1/4 c molasses. I've had the recipe from years back and was confused when I read the reviews last week about there being confusion over 1/4 vs. 1/2 c of molasses. I ran and checked my book of collected recipes over the years and I wrote down 1/4 c molasses from years ago when I saw Martha's recipe in a magazine. I made the cookies the same day and they turned out perfectly. Possibly the typo was made during website maintenance?
    Reply
  • MS11906619
    23 NOV, 2013
    Can someone from MarthaStewart please clarify what the correct amount of molasses is in this recipe, 1/2 or 1/4 cup? The reviews are all over the place, and I'd love to get it right the first time!! Thanks!
    Reply
  • NivensMcTwisp
    20 JAN, 2013
    I have made this gingerbread biscuit every year since I bought my copy of Martha Stewart's Cookies in 2009. I follow the directions implicitly EXCEPT I always add a 1/2 tsp. more of fresh ginger. 1/2 c. of unsulphured molasses IS the correct amount contrary to many reviews. I always use the best dark chocolate I can afford (I use a combination of Valrhona 71% & 85%) and I always make the dough at least 24-48 hours before baking to let the flavours develop, resulting in a superior biscuit.
    Reply

I'm in the mood for:

{{mainDropdownTitle}}
  • breakfast
  • lunch
  • dinner
  • dessert
  • an appetizer
  • a cocktail
{{secDropdownPreword}} {{secDropdownTitle}}
  • that's eggy
  • that's fruity
  • that's hearty
  • that's healthy
  • that's simple
  • that's a smoothie
  • that's a casserole
  • that's off the beaten path
  • that's light
  • that's packable
  • that's speedy
  • that's warming
  • that's kid-friendly
  • that's comforting
  • that's quick
  • that's healthy
  • that's a sunday dinner classic
  • that's vegetarian
  • that's seasonal
  • that's chocolaty
  • that's an american classic
  • that's easy
  • that's fruity
  • that's salty and sweet
  • that's over the top
  • that's crowd pleasing
  • that's simple
  • that's for a cocktail party
  • that's a dip or spread
  • that's healthy
  • that's cheesy
  • that's shaken not stirred
  • that's bubbily
  • that's good for a crowd
  • that's ideal for brunch
  • that's seasonal
  • that's simple
  • that's artisanal
See Recipes