Any dried fruit can be substituted for the raisins. Be sure the cookies are completely cool before storing in an airtight container.

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Ingredients

Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, salt, cinnamon, baking powder, and baking soda. Set aside. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine butter with both sugars, and beat until light and fluffy. Add vanilla, milk, and eggs, and mix well. Add flour mixture, and beat until just combined. Remove bowl from the electric mixer, and stir in oats and raisins. Place dough in the refrigerator until firm, about 2 hours or overnight.

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  • Heat oven to 350 degrees. Line several baking sheets with parchment paper, and set aside. Scoop out 2 tablespoons of dough, and shape into a ball; place on one of the prepared sheets. Repeat with remaining dough, spacing balls 3 inches apart. Press down to flatten into 2-inch diameters.

  • Transfer to the oven, and bake until golden but still soft in center, 16 to 18 minutes, rotating the pans between oven shelves halfway through baking. Remove from oven, and place on a wire rack to cool completely. Store in an airtight container at room temperature up to 1 week.

Reviews (26)

99 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 20
  • 4 star values: 12
  • 3 star values: 39
  • 2 star values: 26
  • 1 star values: 2
Rating: 5 stars
07/29/2019
Ideal texture of crunchy and chewy. Not too sweet. Will make again for sure! Maybe I'd increase the oats and decrease some flour because I'd like to see more oats in the baked cookie.
Rating: 5 stars
05/07/2019
I've made this recipe many, many times; it is the best cookie. I add dried cranberries and chopped, toasted pecans in lieu of the raisins.
Rating: Unrated
11/22/2011
Great recipe although I used pumpkin pie spice instead of cinnamon and doubled the amount. Make sure you use a brand new unopened jar of the spice. After the holidays you can use it up in things like oatmeal or coffee. Always use a fresh jar for baking :-)
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Rating: Unrated
06/06/2011
These cookies were wonderful! They were thick, and soft, and chewy, and delightful in flavor. I made mine with a heaping 1/2 teaspoon of cinnamon. I stored them in a freezer bag with a couple of slices of bread to keep the cookies moist and they were still good a week later, just as the recipe says they will be.
Rating: Unrated
12/27/2010
I made these for my husband, who has the lap band. I used 1/4c stevia instead of sugar and 3/4c Ideal brown sugar (substitutes seem sweeter to me so I reduce the amounts) 2tbls organic sugar (to get that chemical reaction)... These cookies were delicious. I was going to give them away for xmas, but my family kept eating them so I had to make more.
Rating: Unrated
12/18/2009
This is the #1 very best oatmeal cookie. I love 'em!!!
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Rating: Unrated
11/26/2009
I tried these cookies yesterday and I substituted raisins for dried cranberries and I have to say they were absolutely delicious. They reminded me of the delicious gourmet oatmeal cranberry and white chocolate chunk cookies we recently ordered from www.shelbyscookies.com. These are definitely a close second.
Rating: Unrated
10/31/2009
The Very Best!
Rating: Unrated
05/13/2009
The Gold Standard for oatmeal raisin cookies.
Rating: Unrated
03/15/2009
Thanks Martha!! Had the Craving when i got up this Foggy San Francisco Day and are they GOOD!!!!
Rating: Unrated
02/19/2009
this is not the correct recipe for this cookie. There is no wheat germ. Please put up the correct one. thank you
Rating: Unrated
08/26/2008
For all those in opposition to crisco and butter alternatives...some people have to use alternatives to butter due to milk allergies! my breastfed infant has a milk allergy so I've had to find substitutions to milk products for the time being. I'm pretty sure these cookies will still be edible and won't kill me..at least i hope. :)
Rating: Unrated
08/05/2008
Just a quick comment after reading everyone's below here...Butter is the way to go, margirine is way worse in the long run. If your worried about the calories or fat content in the butter just eat less!!!!!!!!
Rating: Unrated
07/26/2008
I agree that butter is the way to go for taste, but during my intermittent waltzes with veganism I have had real success with Soy Garden margarine-type stuff. It seems to bake pretty much like butter, more so than regular margarine. It seems that the health overlords have spoken and Crisco is definitely not a healthy alternative. Adulterated foods are being found at the root of more and more physiological, um, hiccups, if you will.
Rating: Unrated
07/10/2008
Gross, why would you replace crisco w/butter? i don't even keep that nasty stuff in my house!
Rating: Unrated
07/09/2008
To "wduke2": if you would refer to the #6 "jenniura84" comment concerning your question about chewy and moist cookies, I think you will find your answer. You always need to scroll down and read other comments and sometimes you will find your answer also. Also, there are other comments that are very informative to anyone who wants to take the time to read on. I always do on recipes I look at and I have still learned a few techniques and info I didn't know. Thanks to all who take the time.
Rating: Unrated
07/07/2008
Are these cookies soft and chewy or crisp? I want moist and chewy. Joan
Rating: Unrated
07/06/2008
Hi busyfingers, Crisco is trans-fatty; butter is not. I'd use butter, which the lesser (and tastier) of two evils. :) Quote: "3/16/08 at 3:55 p.m. ET Could I possibly use Buter flavored Crisco in place of the butter , to reduce the trans fats iin this recipe, busy_fingers"
Rating: Unrated
04/28/2008
Don't replace the butter! Not because it will effect the recipe (I have no idea about this), but because you're turning something natural and wholesome into something artificial. But more importantly - butter isn't a trans-fat! Trans-fats are vegetable fats made to look like butter by hydrogenating them, that is pumping hydrogen through them to make them solid at room-temperature (vegetable fat is normally liquid - ie oil). If you replace the butter for a substiture, you will be replacing a natural fat (albeit a saturated fat, which is not good for the heart), with a trans-fat. Wikipeadia has a good article on trans-fats if you are interested. I'd always choose to stick with the most natural, unmessed-with product. This has to be the best for your health.
Rating: Unrated
04/01/2008
This is a great oatmeal raisin cookie recipe. I have made it for several years. I make them for my dad for his birthday. They travel well too. I have sent them in the mail to my kids. You need to make sure the dough is chilled until firm, as it says several hours or overnight is best. I made these cookies today. I always stick with the recipe as it is written.
Rating: Unrated
03/16/2008
Could I possibly use Buter flavored Crisco in place of the butter , to reduce the trans fats iin this recipe, busy_fingers
Rating: Unrated
03/09/2008
Salted butter has more moisture than unsalted - it probably won't make a big difference though. Using quick cooking oats will make the cookies crisper and less chewy, as they have already been pre-cooked and dried - they won't gelatinize in the batter the way old-fashioned oats would.
Rating: Unrated
03/09/2008
can i use salted butter instead and quick cooking oats?
Rating: Unrated
03/05/2008
if ever this will be my first time to make oatmeal cookies and i really want to try one. what do old fashioned oats mean? do i have to do something with the oats and raisins before mixing it. or i can use direct from the package? anyone, please help.
Rating: Unrated
01/25/2008
I JUST FINISHED MAKING THE COOKIES,AND THIS IS MY FIRST TIME EVER BAKING ANYTHING AND IT WAS REALLY EASY!!!THEY ALSO TASTE REALLY GOOD.
Rating: Unrated
01/22/2008
These cookies are amazing! I increase the cinnamon to 1 teaspoon and add 1/2 ts. of nutmeg. I also add one cup of lightly toasted walnuts. Yum! Soy milk can be subsituted in place of regular milk.