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Rating: 3.27 stars
161 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 28
  • 4 star values: 39
  • 3 star values: 50
  • 2 star values: 36
  • 1 star values: 8

This scone recipe is from reader Millie Piccuito of Weymouth, Massachusetts. Scones are traditionally served at British-style afternoon teas, or enjoy them for breakfast.

Everyday Food, November 2005

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Recipe Summary

prep:
20 mins
total:
40 mins
Yield:
Makes 8
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Ingredients

Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment or waxed paper. In a large bowl, stir together flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and orange zest.

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  • With a pastry blender or two knives, cut butter into flour mixture until it resembles coarse meal. Stir in dried cranberries.

  • Make a well in the center of the mixture. Add buttermilk, and stir until just combined; do not overmix. Use a little more buttermilk if dough is too dry to work with.

  • Transfer dough to a lightly floured surface; shape into an 8-inch round. Transfer to baking sheet. Cut circle into 8 wedges; space them 1/2 inch apart (to prevent sticking, dust knife with flour). Bake until golden, 18 to 20 minutes.

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Reviews (9)

161 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 28
  • 4 star values: 39
  • 3 star values: 50
  • 2 star values: 36
  • 1 star values: 8
Rating: 5 stars
10/28/2018
I make these over and over again. When I make scones, this is the recipe I use. As Martha Stewart recommends, I buy whatever amount of fresh cranberries I think I might need through the year in late November or in December, before they run out. I freeze them in zip-style freezer bags, and since I buy them organic there is no need to rinse before freezing. I dry whisk the powdered ingredients just before I add the butter and then I add the orange zest, (sometimes I use lemon zest, or tangerine zest). Only then do I add the cranberries and just toss them lightly to powder them up over mixing fresh fruit will cause it to 'bleed' into the dough. Lastly, I add the buttermilk, which I make myself by adding the juice of 1/2 a lemon or lime to 3/4 cup of lowfat milk--it curdles in about 10 minutes, so that is the first thing I do before I begin mixing and adding ingredients. I have a double oven, the top is a regular gas oven; the bottom uses convection heating. What I found is that my scones (Marthas' scones, of course) bake best in a regular oven, my convection oven dries them out and can easily overcook them. I like to dust them lightly with organic powdered sugar, and to have them with cold milk.
Rating: 4 stars
04/28/2018
If you really want a scone with a delicious orange flavor use a little orange extract and orange oil as well as zest. The orange oil is a must and you won't believe what a difference it makes.
Rating: 5 stars
11/10/2013
These are delicious. I double the zest, add 1/8 C frozen concentrated orange juice, and double the cranberries. Bake 5 extra minutes and decrease the temperature by 25* for a moister scone. The glaze is a wonderful way to top these special treats!
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Rating: 4 stars
07/03/2012
These turned out really good! I made them for breakfast; followed the recipe exactly. I sprinkled some sliced blanched almonds on top before putting them in the oven--turned out great!
Rating: Unrated
06/03/2011
These scones were easy to make and tasted good, but in my experience making them, they spread more that I would have liked in the oven. I think possibly adding 1 or 2 more tablespoons of flour could have slightly reduced the stickiness and spreading of the dough. I did not need any additional buttermilk as the recipe suggested possibly needing.
Rating: Unrated
07/20/2010
These are divine and easy! I topped them with an orange glaze as suggested. Also, I used kefir cultured milk instead of buttermilk. They turned out great!
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Rating: Unrated
10/28/2008
This is a wonderful and VERY easy scone. I do the whole thing in the food processor - dry ingr orange zest (pulse), cold butter (pulse), cranberries (pulse), buttermilk (pulse) turn out to form.. Also, I use orange flavored cranberries
Rating: Unrated
03/14/2008
what a great idea. here's a tip, if you juice an orange, lemon, or lime, save the shell and freeze it, then when you need zest you can take the shell and zest it. Sandy Gluck
Rating: Unrated
11/14/2007
So yummy!!! Save the orange and juice it. Mix the juice with confectioners sugar to make a delicious glaze. I cut the dough into smaller portions before baking and then glaze them after they cool to make a great dessert.