This mouthwatering recipe for scones is courtesy of Petersham Nursery.

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Ingredients

Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Preheat oven to 475 degrees. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper; set aside.

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  • In a large bowl, whisk together flour, salt, superfine sugar, and baking powder. Make a well in the center and add butter. Using your fingers, work butter into flour mixture until a crumbly mixture is formed.

  • In a medium bowl, whisk together 3 eggs and milk. Add milk mixture to flour mixture and stir to combine.

  • Turn dough out onto a lightly floured work surface; knead lightly and shape into a round. Roll dough out until it is 1 inch thick. Using a 3-inch biscuit cutter, cut out scones and transfer to prepared baking sheets.

  • In a small bowl, beat remaining egg and brush the top of each scone; sprinkle each with granulated sugar. Transfer baking sheets to oven and bake until golden brown and cooked through, 12 to 14 minutes. Transfer scones to a wire rack and let cool slightly before serving.

Reviews (22)

132 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 34
  • 4 star values: 39
  • 3 star values: 36
  • 2 star values: 14
  • 1 star values: 9
Rating: 5 stars
04/12/2018
I cut the recipe in 1/6. Not easy, but I was making it for one granchild. We added chopped strawberry. She liked it a lot, and I did too. Soft, sweet but not like cake. And the ingredient were all in my kitchen.
Rating: 5 stars
07/25/2011
the scones were delicious! however, be wary of them when they're in the oven. I found 8ish minutes were just fine for mine. (:
Rating: Unrated
07/26/2010
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Rating: Unrated
10/05/2009
After a weekend of experimenting, here's what I found... Scottbutcher's recipe for a 6 scones had too much milk, ended up with a sticky mess for dough and dense scones. Made the scaled down version again using 1/2 cup of milk and then splashed in additional milk until dough barely clung together. Ended with perfectly flakey scones. I tried lowering temp to 450, but found after 12 minutes they hadn't browned at all. Made another batch at 475 and they came out perfect.
Rating: Unrated
10/05/2009
After a weekend of experimenting, here's what I found... Scottbutcher's recipe for a 6 scones had too much milk, ended up with a sticky mess for dough and dense scones. Made the scaled down version again using 1/2 cup of milk and then splashed in additional milk until dough just barely clung together. This gave my scones that perfectly flakey texture. I tried baking at 450 degrees, but found after 12 minutes they hadn't browned at all. Made another batch at 475 and they came out perfect.
Rating: Unrated
02/23/2009
I agree with shellbell14, the temp was too high. The first time I made it, I thought I would do the temp lower, because I didn't want to burn them. They didn't really poof up and rise like on the video, though. Second time I did 475 degrees for abt. 9 minutes. They burned a little, but didn't seem completely done. They seemed to rise a little more though. Did other peoples' do fine? It seems like a tricky recipe. Any help would be welcome.
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Rating: Unrated
01/18/2009
These are fantastic! I made them yesterday and again today, topped with butter and red raspberry jam, but their even good plain. Haven't found Devonshire cream just yet.
Rating: Unrated
01/18/2009
In response to yellobutterfly. you can maker superfine sugar by putting regular sugar into a food processor or blender. Shellbell, the recipe calls for 1/4 plus 2 TBS of sugar. Did anyone else try this recipe?
Rating: Unrated
01/14/2009
I just made this recipe and was disappointed. First off, the recommended oven temp seemed way to high-the scones started to burn on the bottom after 7 minutes. Also, they seemed way more like a biscuit instead of a "scone". I added more sugar to the recipe as a little over 2Tbs. seemed way to shy given 6c. flour.
Rating: Unrated
01/14/2009
also, would you just use a knife, or is there a triangle shaped cutter?
Rating: Unrated
01/14/2009
I don't have superfine, and I don't know what castor sugar is, will granulated white work? IF so, do I use the same amount, or less/more since it is a different sugar? On the show they showed a picture of these scones but they were a triangle shape and had a white glaze drizzled on top, was that a powdered sugar glaze, or is that devonshire cream also?
Rating: Unrated
01/08/2009
I'll try that again. Sory, ignore the previous scaled recipe. Here is the correct recipe: 2 cups all-purpose flour 2 tablespoons castor sugar 2 teaspoons baking powder 4 tablespoons cold butter 1 egg 1 cup milk Makes about half a dozen scones.
Rating: Unrated
01/08/2009
Sorry, my scaled version of the recipe makes about HALF a dozen scones, noy s dozen
Rating: Unrated
01/08/2009
Thanks for the help...I will look for Devonshire cream...it sounds delicious!
Rating: Unrated
01/08/2009
Devonshire cream is available from Bristol Markets among other merchants. If you can't find it, you can make a close substitute by mixing mascarpone and whipped cream in equal amounts
Rating: Unrated
01/08/2009
Here is the recipe properly sclaed. I have tested it and it works - wonderful scones. 2 cups all-purpose flour 2 tablespoons castor sugar 2 teaspoons baking powder pinch salt 2 tablespoons butter 1 egg 1 cup milk Makes a dozen
Rating: Unrated
01/08/2009
Martha mentioned she eats her scones with a particular topping and jam. What was the buttery type topping she used?
Rating: Unrated
01/07/2009
In response to karenlouisesm: n n n n equals 6/8 plus 2 tablespoons =7/8 - so those amounts are the same . The point is that it is unprofessionally scaled. You always scale to the closest whole number for the main ingredient (in this case flour) and if you are off a little for some measurements you round off to the closest sensible fraction that is not going to affect the recipe's outcome.
Rating: Unrated
01/07/2009
or half the thickness would work too
Rating: Unrated
01/07/2009
The recipe given on television and the one here have different amounts of flour. Is the correct amount 6 1/4 c. or 6 1/2? Also, the milk was 1 7/8 c. and here it is a little different. Suggestions? -Karen
Rating: Unrated
01/07/2009
I think what null meant to say was that her boyfriend rolls out the dough to TWICE the size and then folds it onto itself (which returns it to its original size) The way she explains it doesn't make sense..
Rating: Unrated
01/07/2009
I like the idea of the fold over, I will try this soon. The strange thing is that my biscuit recipe is almost the same. Smaller, but the egg wash will really add a lot . Can't wait. Rose