Your house should look as stunning from the outside as it does on the inside.

By Jillian Kramer
August 14, 2019
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Credit: JenniferPhotographyImaging/Getty Images

Shrubs can add instant curb appeal to any home. Not only do these hedges add structured accents to your landscape, but most grow year-round, which means they can add a pop of color to your yard even in the coldest (or snowiest) months, says Lester Poole, Lowe's live nursery specialist.

Plus, "shrubs put a fresh, lively face on your front yard, frame the home landscape, and offer an inviting welcome to visitors," Poole adds. So, if you'd like to add shrubs—and curb appeal—to your home, then here are five especially eye-pleasing options the pro says you'll want to consider.

Emerald Green Arborvitae

This shrub gets its name in part from its hue—emerald—and can grow to a towering 15-feet-tall and 4-feet-wide, says Poole. It requires at least six hours of sun a day to thrive, and it's best to plant this shrub in the spring, summer, and fall. "Arborvitae shrubs and the vibrant green foliage complement major curb accents such as mailboxes, borders, flower beds, and more," says Poole. "Its disease-resistant foliage retains its color, even in winter, and never needs trimming."

Viburnum Tinus Compactum

More stout bush than towering tree, the 4-foot-tall, 6-foot-wide Viburnum Tinus Compactum is a smart option for those who would like to plant shrubs near to their home. As Poole explains, "its compact growth makes this a favorite choice for small hedges or foundation plantings." Adding to the list of reasons why this shrub is perfect for the flower beds closet to your house, it also thrives in partial shade and boasts fragrant, pinkish-white flowers—a pleasant welcome for any visitors.

Blushing Bride Rose of Sharon

As Poole puts it, the pink-hued Blushing Bride Rose of Sharon is "a showy specimen." It grows to 10-feet-tall and 6-feet-wide, and "produces upright, willowy branches with large, pink, double blooms that are perfect for achieving colorful curb appeal in late summertime," he says. Blushing Bride Rose of Sharon requires partial sun and requires semi-moist soil for best growth.

Sasanqua Camellia

Drought tolerant, the Sasanqua Camellia is ideal for dry climates. It comes in single and multi-color varieties that can add hues of pink, red, and white and white to your yard. Plus, this shrub "retains its foliage throughout the year," Poole says, "making it the perfect option for placement in prominent areas of your landscape, like the front yard." The shrub grows best in areas that provide partial shade—but with supplemental nutrition, it can also thrive in full-sun conditions.

Wine and Roses Weigela

The Wine and Roses Weigela shows off rosy-pink flowers in late spring and dark purple foliage in the summer, Poole says. "It's great in shrub borders surrounding the front and back of the house, or as a specimen plant," he adds. The flowering shrub grows to 5-feet-tall, and needs full sun.

Comments (8)

Anonymous
May 3, 2020
Pictures are worth a thousand words! Please put pictures of these shrubs plus growing zones so we know if this is an option for our situation. Without pictures it's not of interest, sorry!!
Anonymous
May 3, 2020
Pictures are all in the video clip
Anonymous
May 3, 2020
Regarding lack of photos....all I can think of is your daughter’s TV show, “Whatever Martha”. 🙄
Anonymous
April 3, 2020
Not only pictures but zoning info as well.
Anonymous
March 8, 2020
I agree with annedg43. You only talk about 5 kinds of shrubs, & NO photos of them? Why...you have the ability to get these photos & put it with the article through your own inventory of photos. I want to know what they are, but I feel the article should not have been printed without photos showing what they look like in a family yard for reference.
Anonymous
March 8, 2020
Photos of these shrubs would have made this article worthwhile
Anonymous
March 8, 2020
I agree -- pictures would have been super helpful
Anonymous
September 8, 2019
I was very interested in your article about 5 plants for curb appeal but was disappointed that you didn’t show pictures. Being a plant illiterate I have no idea what you’re talking about.