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Dried Floral Branches

Some things of beauty are a joy forever, but delicate flowering quince—a traditional symbol of love and abundance—lasts only a week or two. This blooming-good imitation is the exception.

dried flower branches in a blue vase

Photography: Kana Okada

Source: Martha Stewart Living, January/February 2019

Introduction

Flowering quince are one of the first to bloom in early spring, its branches brimming with fluffy blooms. When the world outside is chilly and gray, a gathering of these stems really brightens the room. If your home and garden feel colorless in the winter months, let them serve as inspiration for dried hydrangeas. You can replicate other blossoming branches with this technique. White hydrangeas mimic almond or orange blossoms; yellow ones pass for forsythia. They'll look fresh well past winter, and keep your household in the pink.

 

For more ideas, scroll through our collection of nature crafts and dried flower ideas.

materials

  • Dried flowers (Pictured: Arte Flor natural preserved hydrangeas, in Light Pink, $20, gorgeousflowers.us.)

  • Branches (Pictured: DriedDecor.com decorative birch branches, $7 per bunch, drieddecor.com.)

  • Scissors

  • Craft glue

steps

  1. Snip petal clusters off pink or red freeze-dried hydrangeas. 

  2. Glue them to branches.

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