New This Month

How to Decorate for Thanksgiving Like "Queer Eye's" Bobby Berk

Hint: You’ll need lots of pumpkins.

Senior Editor
bobby berk queer eye

“Queer Eye” home expert Bobby Berk hasn’t spent Thanksgiving at his home in Los Angeles since he moved there about two-and-a-half years ago. In 2017, he was in Atlanta, filming seasons one and two of the hit Netflix series, and this November, he’ll be in Kansas City, where he and his fellow members of the Fab Five are currently shooting season three. But that doesn’t stop him from bringing a little fall flavor to his tabletop.

 

[GET INSPIRED: With These Gorgeous Fall Tablescape Ideas]

 

“For Thanksgiving, I like to use a lot of natural things, like pumpkins,” says Berk, who was in New York recently as part of his partnership with Delta Faucet. “I don’t like using things that you then have to store, and that will end up in a landfill eventually.”

 

Sustainability is a focus on the show, where the hosts are just as likely to take their “heroes” (Berk’s word for the main subject of each episode) to a consignment store as they are to a boutique, and in Berk’s work with Delta Faucet, which recently introduced a voice-activated model that links with Amazon Alexa to let you create custom commands (i.e., you can turn off the water from across the kitchen, to waste less).

 

[SUSTAINABLE LIVING: Learn How You Can Make a Difference]
pumpkins and gourds
Photography by: Getty

So for Thanksgiving, it’s pumpkins all the way. Berk may not have a go-to L.A. produce source yet—he’s barely there enough to keep his fiddle-leaf fig trees and orchids alive, although he says his husband is doing an admirable job—but he has branched out in his current adopted home. In Kansas City, he heads to City Market in the historic River Market neighborhood, where you can find a nice, wide variety of gourds.

 

“I don’t like the plain orange ones—I like the ones with bumps all over them, different colors,” Berk says. “I will put together a tabletop with them—candles and pumpkins are great for holiday. And once you’re done with dinner, you can cut them open and make soup or pie.”

 

When the pies and soup are gone, Berk will head out for real tree branches—no fake garlands for him—to decorate for the December holidays.

 

“I am not [big into] typical red and green for Christmas. I like making it more holiday by adding candles and metals, like gold and silver,” he says.

 

And with any luck, he’ll be spending them at home in California.