New This Month

Meet the Superneutrals: Your New Favorite Paint Palette

Five looks to get you inspired. 

mld105713_0510_paintjarglossary2.jpg

Want more color in your home, but too afraid to be too bold? We've got the answer: 18 go-with-everything, classic-yet-modern, nature-inspired hues, plus project ideas for every room. Our formula: mixing colors with neutrals. Meet the (super versatile) superneutrals. 

 

Whether you're a longtime color master, or you've never been quite so brave, these superneutral paint picks are for you. They will enliven any styled room, whether modern or traditional, vibrant or restrained. And a little goes a long way. Try the hues in simple painting projects—from furniture and lampshades to walls and ceilings—that promise to complete transform your space. 

 

[PRINT: The Full Paint Palette Guide Here]

 

The Palette

1. Buoyant Blue, No. 6483, Sherwin-Williams, sherwin-williams.com
2. Dragonfly, No. AF-510, Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com
3. Gray Horse, No. 2140-50, Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com
4. Blue Fir, No. MSL124, Martha Stewart Living Paint, homedepot.com
5. Cooking Apple Green, No. 32, Farrow & Ball, farrow-ball.com
6. Titanium, No. 2141-60, Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com
7. Punch, No. MSL014, Martha Stewart Living Paint, homedepot.com
8. Stonington Gray, No. HC-170, Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com
9. Babouche, No. 223HC-170, Farrow & Ball, farrow-ball.com
10. Heath, No. MSL212, Martha Stewart Living Paint, homedepot.com
11. Natural Twine, No. MSL217, Martha Stewart Living Paint, homedepot.com
12. Lancaster Blue, No. UL34, Ralph Lauren Paint, ralphlauren.com
13. Makaha, No. 19-32, Pratt & Lambert, prattandlambert.com

mld105713_0510_paintjarglossary1.jpg

14. Ash Bark, No. MSL211, Martha Stewart Living Paint, homedepot.com
15. Morning Walk, No. VM58, Ralph Lauren Paint, ralphlauren.com
16. Feldspar, No. MSL131, Martha Stewart Living Paint, homedepot.com
17. Mink, No. SW6004,Sherwin-Williams, sherwin-williams.com
18. Wampum, No. MSL179, Martha Stewart Living Paint, homedepot.com

 

[LEARN: More About Selecting the Best Superneutrals For Your Space]
mld105713_0510_livingroommain_1.jpg

The Look: Soft and Striking Living Room

Why These Colors Work: Looking at this room of subdued peaches and tans, you might not think "contrast." But the accent pieces—end tables painted Lancaster Blue (12) and a round tray coated in Babouche yellow (9)—are in complementary colors that bring just enough modern pop to the formal setting. We unified two different end tables of the same height by painting them in the same color. Lampshades are often lined in peach to tint the light. Here, we painted the exterior of the shades to project the flattering color into the space.

 

[SEE: How Paint Dramatically Transformed This Living Room]
mld104784_0510_paint_swatches1.jpg

On the ceiling: This earthy tan (10) has an olive tone that works well with yellows. Think of it as sophisticated camouflage.

On the walls: This warm beige (11), taken from nature and tinged with peach, is one of Martha's favorite wall colors.

On the lampshades: A light and airy peach (15) with brown undertones, it adds sweetness without being saccharine.

On the side tables: Painted this deep, muted blue (12), furniture in a traditional shape takes on a more contemporary feel.

On the tray: A creamy honey mustard with a hint of gold, this yellow (9) brightens whatever it touches

mld105713_0510_valance.jpg

The Look: Vantage Point with a View 

Why These Colors Work: Three shades of green mingle by a window, showing how well superneutrals get along. Painted the grayish hue of a blue fir (4), the handsome wooden valance has a strong cutout shape. We accented its silhouette with a crisp stenciled border in light apple green (5), also applied to the picture frame. The stool got a similar treatment. We painted the legs a deeper shade of teal (2), leaving the raised edges the original gray color.

mld104784_0510_paint_swatches2.jpg

On the walls: A sweet, slightly cool white (6) that suggests fluffy snow or fresh whipped cream.

On the window mullions: A stony or steely gray (8) that adds an extra dimension to woodwork and a layer of depth to a room.

On the valance: Regal yet earthy, this strong, mossy, grayish blue-green (4) is a good partner for Dragonfly (see 2, below).

On the valance border and picture frame: One of our favorite superneutrals: The pale Granny Smith green (5) makes a sharp highlight for trim.

On the stool legs: A dose of taupe mutes this jewel tone (2). Use it to ground a piece of furniture, and then go a little wild with the upholstery.

mld105713_0510_bathroom_0101.jpg

The Look: Bright Notes in the Bathroom 

Why These Colors Work: Bathed in soft gray (3) and enlivened with peach (7), what's normally a utilitarian space becomes warm and welcoming. This mirror's carved-wood frame is an unexpected flourish. We painted its acanthus-leaf curls in peach to stand out against and harmonize with the gray bead board. A wooden towel rack—the sort often found at flea markets and country antiques stores—was coated in sky blue (1). The monogrammed trash bin, embellished with peach and blue, pulls the palette together.

 

[HERE'S: How to Paint the Perfect Wall]
mld104784_0510_paint_swatches3.jpg

On the walls: Like a cozy, wintry day, this classic gray (3) has a pretty, watery quality. It's a great foundation color for any room.

On the mirror and trash bin: Definitely a strong peach, but the gray base prevents it from being garish—just the right amount of drama.

On the towel rack and monogram: An airy sky blue (1) that's beautiful on a ceiling but strong enough to hold its own anywhere.

mld105713_0510_homeoffice2.jpg

The Look: Cool and Collected Office 

Why These Colors Work: Among the easiest colors to add to a room, grayish blue greens are layered here to create a calming effect in a home office. The warm gray wall color (14) was also used on the sides and interiors of the open-back bookcases, giving them the feel of built-ins. A minty green on the case's front (16), applied with a short roller, adds crisp definition. The same paint was used on storage baskets stowed in the lower cubbies. Rounding out the palette, the desk is painted a misty, barely there grayish blue green (13). Because the wood of this Ikea piece was so smooth to begin with, we chose glossy paint, adding shine to the many textures in the space.

mld104784_0510_paint_swatches4.jpg

On the walls and bookcase interior: Like khakis you want to wear every day. It has a greenish tint (14), but it's still warm.

On the bookcase fronts: A classic Martha mint, this green (16) shines against putty colors. It's ideal for accenting furniture.

On the desk: Want a break from straight-up white? This is the perfect upgrade. A hint of green (13) allows it to work with darker and lighter shades. To bring out its complexities, paint something large -- even a ceiling.

mld105713_0510_diningroom2_0043.jpg

The Look: Spring-Inspired Dining Room 

Why These Colors Work: Lavender (18) brushed on the bases of tabletop domes adds dimension to the earthy gray-green palette of this dining room. We selected semigloss paint for this easy centerpiece project; it yields a soft sheen that plays off the glistening glass domes and the gleaming rosewood pedestal table. Although our tabletop domes are new, vintage pieces are also available. Use one or more as a centerpiece year-round, filled with flowering plants that echo the china or artwork you have in the room. A picture frame painted dark taupe (17) ties in nicely with the linen-covered chairs, while the pale-green ceiling (5) lightens the space.

mld104784_0510_paint_swatches5.jpg

On the ceiling: This shade (5) is equally intriguing on a ceiling or as an accent color.

On the picture frame: This rich lavender taupe (17) doesn't compete with its neighbors, such as artwork.

On the dome bases: A moody, Victorian-inspired lavender (18). More of a trim or accent color, it freshens a space without being loud.