New This Month

crocheted clutch tassel step 3B
Crochet and Rosé: 2 Secrets to the Most Memorable Party of the Summer

Crochet and Rosé: 2 Secrets to the Most Memorable Party of the Summer

Raise a glass to the craftiest soirée of the season.

Gather 'Round

Crochet is the summer sister to knitting. So while the weather is warm, why not host a crafternoon where guests can sip, stitch, and savor the moment?

The emphasis here is on effortless entertaining, according to a host of many such parties: Alberto Bravo, founder of We Are Knitters, an international DIY kit brand. Alongside his friend and cofounder Pepita Marín, they host parties to mingle with other like-minded makers, enjoy drinks and snacks, and crochet the hours away. In his view, there are three essentials to consider in the planning: a well-lit space, refreshments, and quality materials to work with. "When looking for a place to host the perfect crochet and rosé party always take lighting into account," he says. "Make sure the space is neither too dark—as cozy as they may be are not ideal for DIY—nor too bright: the glare can be harsh on eyesight as well." A crochet party can be for beginners and advanced crocheters, hosted by one artisan who can help guide the group through a project. 

As for the rosé? "It's an instant conversation starter and people who don't know each other will feel more at ease, too."

Pick a Project

Now for the fun part: picking your project. We recommend something accessible to crocheters across all skill levels. For this, we suggest a basic blanket, a cowl scarf, or a stylish clutch. Beginner crocheters will be encouraged at how easy it is to achieve, and your more advanced crocheters can add their personal touches such as a tassel adornment, a monogrammed applique, or more fanciful stitches.

Bring a Bundle

While you may be inclined to gather all of the materials yourself, why not call on friends to contribute their creativity? We like the idea of a more casual BYOY set-up ("bring your own yarn," that is). Therefore, encourage your guests to bring their own skeins and balls of yarn or their go-to hook. That way, everyone can swap and share the beautiful assortment of colors, textures, and varieties. Just remember to include two essential project details on the invitation: the size hook and yarn weight needed.

Set the Scene

While guests are stitching and mingling together, offer them refreshments that are light and easy-to-grab. On a wooden serving board, present a summery arrangement of fruits, figs, and savory cheeses. They all pair beautifully with rosé.

As for your signature sip? Rosé wine is synonymous with summer, and while we love the dry and delicate kind—full of fruity apricot and floral tones—a bolder, more medium-bodied bottle is always welcomed with richer foods.

Know Your Stitches

The chain stitch and the single crochet: With these two basic stitches, you'll be able to make our crocheted clutch with a chic color-blocked design. Add on a tassel, and call it yours.

  • 1
    To Begin

    Any crochet project begins with a slipknot. To do this, make a loop, insert your crochet hook into the loop, catch the lower yarn, and draw it up through loop. Then, tighten by pulling the long end of the yarn downward.

    To Begin
  • 2
    Chain Stitch

    This follows with a chain stitch, which is the basic technique of your first, or foundation, row. With working yarn in your left hand and the hook in your right, wrap yarn around hook, and draw it through slipknot. Again, tighten.

    Chain Stitch
  • 3
    Single Crochet

    A row of single crochet stitches are then worked into these chain stitches. Insert hook through second chain stitch from hook. Wrap the yarn around your hook, and draw it through the stitch. Wrap yarn a second time, drawing it through both loops on your hook. As you work, you can adjust the tension by pulling on yarn until the existing loop fits around the hook.

    Single Crochet

Lives of the Party

And who is on the guest list? At our Arlo SoHo rooftop party, we invited a close-knit group of talented makers who, needless to say, know their way with a hook and yarn.

  • Pepita Marín and Alberto Bravo
    Pepita Marín and Alberto Bravo

    Meet our hosts: Alberto and Pepita, the founders of We Are Knitters. As the duo behind this Spain-based DIY kit brand, they've developed a close relationship with their large community of makers all over the world. Best of all? Their tools and materials all come in a reusable, recycled brown paper bag. Eco-friendly is always en vogue.

  • Alexandra Tavel
    Alexandra Tavel

    As the creative mind behind Two of Wands, Alexandra develops patterns and finished pieces in New York City using simple stitches and techniques that result in sophisticated wearable items. (Sounds like the perfect pairing to us.)

  • Lesley Ware
    Lesley Ware

    When she's not teaching sewing at School of Design and The Met, Lesley is busy working in her Brooklyn, N.Y. studio. Her latest project? A book aptly titled, "How to Be a Fashion Designer."

  • Teresa Carter
    Teresa Carter

    She first learned to crochet with an altruistic aspiration: crafting blankets for children growing up in the orphanages of Haiti. Today, Teresa has the DeBrosse craft brand to her name in New York City and two qualities we admire: a minimalist aesthetic and a charitable mindset (15 percent of all sales to help fund two orphanages).

  • Pepita Marín and Alberto Bravo
    Pepita Marín and Alberto Bravo

    Meet our hosts: Alberto and Pepita, the founders of We Are Knitters. As the duo behind this Spain-based DIY kit brand, they've developed a close relationship with their large community of makers all over the world. Best of all? Their tools and materials all come in a reusable, recycled brown paper bag. Eco-friendly is always en vogue.

  • Lesley Ware
    Lesley Ware

    When she's not teaching sewing at School of Design and The Met, Lesley is busy working in her Brooklyn, N.Y. studio. Her latest project? A book aptly titled, "How to Be a Fashion Designer."

  • Alexandra Tavel
    Alexandra Tavel

    As the creative mind behind Two of Wands, Alexandra develops patterns and finished pieces in New York City using simple stitches and techniques that result in sophisticated wearable items. (Sounds like the perfect pairing to us.)

  • Teresa Carter
    Teresa Carter

    She first learned to crochet with an altruistic aspiration: crafting blankets for children growing up in the orphanages of Haiti. Today, Teresa has the DeBrosse craft brand to her name in New York City and two qualities we admire: a minimalist aesthetic and a charitable mindset (15 percent of all sales to help fund two orphanages).

Left in Stitches

As the day winds down and people put the finishing touches on their clutches, offer any remaining bundles of untouched yarn to your guests as a parting favor. Crocheters can never have enough yarn, hooks, or notions to keep stitching throughout the season. Plus, as any crafter will tell you, leftover supplies are always fodder for a new project (or, as the case may be here, another party.)