New This Month

These Pretty Floral Pajamas Will Make You Ditch Your Sweats

We are swooning over the new Rebecca Taylor and Eberjey line.

Senior Home and Style Editor
Designers Rebecca Taylor and Ali Mejia
Photography by: Courtesy of Rebecca Taylor
Designers Rebecca Taylor and Ali Mejia work on the new collaboration.

Sure, after a long day at work, we all love throwing on comfortable sweats and our favorite worn-in T-shirt, but on those nights we do slip into something a bit more put together: 

 

“You feel really great, right?,” says designer Rebecca Taylor. “When I wear pretty lingerie, I feel like a different person -- same with lipstick. They change my life.”

 

It’s this instant confidence boost that prompted the designer, known for her modern feminine aesthetic, to create a line of lingerie. 

 

“Silk pajamas make a women feel grown-up and sexy,” she says. “It’s like her secret.”

 

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Rebecca Taylor x Eberjey pajamas
Photography by: Courtesy of Rebecca Taylor

Taylor found the perfect partner in Eberjey, the Miami-based intimates brand, co-founded by designer Ali Mejia, whose comfortable-yet-chic Gisele we can’t get enough of. Launching in stores and online this week, the limited-edition collection of sumptuous silk and lace separates will retail for $68 to $368, and feature seven mix-and-match pieces including camisoles, bralettes, and full-length pajama sets in sensual neutral tones and a delicate floral print.

 

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Rebecca Taylor x Eberjey shorts
Photography by: Courtesy of Rebecca Taylor

Speaking of that print: “I think I originally got it from a 1940s nightie,” reveals Taylor. “It’s a classic from our archives. I’ve always loved rosebud prints. Wild roses and flowers are very much part of our brand history.”

 

Taylor’s interest in after-hour glam also comes from her obsession with Victorian-era lingerie. “I found it fascinating they put so much work into under clothes -- there’s something to be learned there,” she says. “The Victorian women were feeling sexy underneath their austere [attire].”