New This Month

You Can Donate Your Eclipse Glasses to Kids Around the World

Astronomers Without Borders will send them to schools in South America and Asia when eclipses cross those continents in 2019.

kids watching solar eclipse
Photography by: Getty

If you caught a real glimpse of Monday's solar eclipse, you were likely wearing protective eyewear specially designed for the event. (Good on you for taking the necessary safety precaution!)

 

And chances are, you've still got those eclipse glasses: strewn on the coffee table, tucked away in a drawer somewhere or stashed in a cabinet of clutter. Before you overhaul your space and throw away useless items, consider donating them to Astronomers Without Borders as part of the Eclipse Glasses Redistribution Program. The organization is offering to collect used glasses for a solid cause.

 

"Astronomers Without Borders and its partners will be announcing a program to collect glasses after the eclipse, to be sent to schools in South America and Asia when eclipses cross those continents in 2019," the company announced in a Facebook post. "Information on how you can participate in this program to spread STEM resources around the world will be coming soon so gather them up."

 

[HELP HERE: 7 Ways to Knit or Crochet for Charity]

Though specific locations to ship the glasses to aren't yet known, the organization wants you to hang onto them for the time being. According to Astronomers Without Borders President Mike Simmons, this is an opportunity for international schools to integrate science experience into curriculum. "Many schools in developing countries don't have resources for science education, and this is a rare opportunity that inspires students and teachers and shows them that science is something they can do," he said to Gizmodo. "It can be a ray of hope for young people who don't otherwise see a path to a career like this."

 

So don't toss — and sign up for the AWB newsletter for updates.

 

Looking for more science? Watch our own Professor Figgy show you how to make glow-in-the-dark fog bubbles: