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10 Things You Didn't Know About Dyeing Easter Eggs

Egg-dyeing is a delicate art. The colors may bleed and get muddy, or the patterns might not come out exactly as you intended. Here, our craft experts share tips they have culled from years of egg-decorating experience and steps on how to achieve the perfect results for some of our favorite decorating techniques. Whether you're a novice or an eggs-pert, your basket is sure to impress the Easter Bunny this year. Be sure to watch Martha demonstrate on Facebook LIVE at 1pm TODAY!

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  • Blow Out Your Eggs to Keep Them Longer

    If you want to save your eggs from year to year or turn them into ornaments, blow them out instead of hard-boiling the eggs.

  • Learn the Art of Color Mixing
    Learn the Art of Color Mixing

    When using more than one color on an egg (for dyed patterns), it usually works best if you can use similar colors, such as green and blue or red and orange. A good rule is to stick to colors that are close to each other on the color wheel. Very different colors, such as red and green, tend to look muddy if they overlap.

  • Always Prepare Eggs by Dipping them in Vinegar
    Always Prepare Eggs by Dipping them in Vinegar

    Prepare a bowl of plain white vinegar and dip eggs into the liquid before dyeing. The vinegar will take off any lumpy bits and make the eggs more absorbant.

  • Think Negatively...Space-wise
    Think Negatively...Space-wise

    Apply wax to eggs in creative designs, then dye. The color won't penetrate the wax, allowing your design to show. Add simple monograms or doodles with a crayon, or use a stylus for more precise designs.

  • Blow Out Your Eggs to Keep Them Longer

    If you want to save your eggs from year to year or turn them into ornaments, blow them out instead of hard-boiling the eggs.

  • Always Prepare Eggs by Dipping them in Vinegar
    Always Prepare Eggs by Dipping them in Vinegar

    Prepare a bowl of plain white vinegar and dip eggs into the liquid before dyeing. The vinegar will take off any lumpy bits and make the eggs more absorbant.

  • Learn the Art of Color Mixing
    Learn the Art of Color Mixing

    When using more than one color on an egg (for dyed patterns), it usually works best if you can use similar colors, such as green and blue or red and orange. A good rule is to stick to colors that are close to each other on the color wheel. Very different colors, such as red and green, tend to look muddy if they overlap.

  • Think Negatively...Space-wise
    Think Negatively...Space-wise

    Apply wax to eggs in creative designs, then dye. The color won't penetrate the wax, allowing your design to show. Add simple monograms or doodles with a crayon, or use a stylus for more precise designs.

Watch the Clock

Timing is everything when it comes to acheiving an array of shades. Whether you are looking for a deep forest green or a barely-there, sun-kissed yellow, download this handy reference chart -- it will help you figure out how long to dip each egg for the desired result.

  • Use the Color in Fabrics
    Use the Color in Fabrics

    No counting drops here! This technique transfers the silk's colors right onto the egg. Give your Easter eggs a one-of-a-kind look with this simple silk-dyeing technique.

  • Experiment and Go Au Naturale
    Experiment and Go Au Naturale

    Look to Mother Nature for colorful -- and nontoxic -- inspiration for colorful dyes. Common food items such as red cabbage, onion skins, and coffee can be used to transform plain white eggs into colorful Easter gems.

  • Don't Be Afraid to Pile it On
    Don't Be Afraid to Pile it On

    Accessorizing your egg is a good thing. Use the dye as a base. Then, build on top of that. Give your egg eyes, ears, lace, rhinestones, or clip-art decoupage.

  • Give Them Time to Dry
    Give Them Time to Dry

    We've tried resting the eggs back in the carton, setting them in egg holders, even holding them and blowing at them until our arms started shaking. The best way to dry an egg (hands down) is to set it on a pin-board. This will prevent the color from pooling and uneven drying. The board can be reused.

  • Use the Color in Fabrics
    Use the Color in Fabrics

    No counting drops here! This technique transfers the silk's colors right onto the egg. Give your Easter eggs a one-of-a-kind look with this simple silk-dyeing technique.

  • Don't Be Afraid to Pile it On
    Don't Be Afraid to Pile it On

    Accessorizing your egg is a good thing. Use the dye as a base. Then, build on top of that. Give your egg eyes, ears, lace, rhinestones, or clip-art decoupage.

  • Experiment and Go Au Naturale
    Experiment and Go Au Naturale

    Look to Mother Nature for colorful -- and nontoxic -- inspiration for colorful dyes. Common food items such as red cabbage, onion skins, and coffee can be used to transform plain white eggs into colorful Easter gems.

  • Give Them Time to Dry
    Give Them Time to Dry

    We've tried resting the eggs back in the carton, setting them in egg holders, even holding them and blowing at them until our arms started shaking. The best way to dry an egg (hands down) is to set it on a pin-board. This will prevent the color from pooling and uneven drying. The board can be reused.

Let Your Egg Shine

You can give your egg a nice sheen by applying a few coats of Martha Stewart Crafts sprayable gloss enamel after you are done dyeing.

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