Feijoada

Explore some new flavors with this hearty meat stew, a traditional dish in both Portugal and Brazil.

  • Servings: 10
Feijoada

Source: Mad Hungry

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds dried black beans, picked through
  • 2 pound fresh pork ears, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 2 fresh pork feet, cut into 6 pieces each
  • 1 fresh pork tongue, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 pound fresh pork ribs, cut into individual ribs
  • 3/4 pound slab bacon (smoked pork belly), cut into 2-by-1/4-inch pieces
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 8 ounces smoked pork sausage, such as andouille or kielbasa, sliced 1/4 inch thick on the bias
  • Coarse salt and ground black pepper, to taste
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 medium yellow onion, finely chopped
  • 10 cloves garlic, minced

Directions

  1. Soak beans in cold water for at least 8 hours or overnight. Drain and add to an 8- to 10-quart Dutch oven or large stockpot, nesting pork pieces, bacon, and bay leaves in beans. Cover with water by about 1/2 inch.

  2. Bring to a boil, then lower heat and simmer, uncovered, skimming any foam and fat for the first 1 1/2 hours. Remove pork ribs. Cover and cook for another 1 1/2 hours, stirring occasionally. Add smoked sausage, cover, and continue cooking 1/2 hour more. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

  3. Heat oil in a large heavy skillet over medium-high heat. When oil shimmers, add onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until browned, about 20 minutes. Sprinkle 1/4 teaspoon salt over minced garlic and smash into a paste using the side of a knife blade. Add garlic to skillet and cook until golden brown, about 2 minutes. Add onion and garlic mixture to beans and simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes more, for a total cooking time of 4 hours, or until all are falling apart and melting into the beans. Season with salt to taste.

  4. Serve hot with Garlic Rice, Collard Greens, Farofa, Tomato and Onion Vinaigrette, and orange slices.

Cook's Note

This dish can be cooked in an 8- to 10-quart Dutch oven or a large stockpot. Some of the traditional meats, such as salted dry beef or salted pork loin are difficult to find. If you use salted pork instead of fresh, soak it in cold water overnight, changing the water at least once, and then discard the water and rinse the pieces before cooking. The meats used in this version aren't too fatty and cook together at the same time. The exception is the sausage, which is added later in the cooking process. Ask your butcher to cut the meats for you.

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