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Project

Spider Sentry

This giant spider queen is brought to life with just a few party-store supplies. She dangles near the entryway in her enormous web, waiting to snare her prey.

Introduction

Arachnophobes beware: This terrifyingly larger-than-life spiderweb bars entry to the house; a silver of an opening is the only way through. beyond the web, newborn spiders emerge from pendulous egg sacs.

Materials

  • Large paper or plastic spider
  • Black acrylic paint and paintbrush
  • 2 foam balls (1 large and 1 small)
  • Serrated knife
  • Hot-glue gun
  • Black faux fur (optional)
  • 2 red beads
  • Straight pins
  • String
  • Pushpins or adhesive hooks
  • Scissors
  • Fiberglass window screening (100 foot rolls)
  • Kraft paper or newspaper
  • Chalk
  • Yardstick
  • White paint marker

Steps

  1. Step 1

    spider-how-to-1010sip1003.jpg

    For the queen, coat a large paper or plastic party-store spider with black paint. Cut both foam balls in half with a serrated knife: You'll need one foam ball that's slightly larger than the spider's head, and one slightly larger than its body.

  2. Step 2

    Paint one large half and one small half black (save the others for another use); let dry. Use hot glue to cover larger foam ball with strips of black faux fur, if desired. Hot-glue the halved balls to the head and body. For each eye, slide a red bead onto a straight pin, and press it into the top of the foam head.

  3. Step 3

    To hang the spider in front of its web, pin a length of string to the body, and attach the other end to the ceiling with a pushpin or hook.

  4. Step 4

    spider-how-to-1010sip1003b.jpg

    To make a webbed entryway, cut fiberglass window screening to desired size. Lay screening on kraft paper or newspaper to protect work surface. mark the web's center with chalk and draw radiating lines using a yardstick as a guide. Connect lines to make a web pattern; add smaller webs in the corners. Using a white paint marker and yardstick, color over chalk lines. Once paint is dry, cut out a triangular entrance, using web lines as a guide. Snip edges randomly for a jagged look. Tack screen to porch using pushpins.