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  1. Good Thing

    Cherry Stains, Solved

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    Blot excess juice with a clean, damp cloth. Then squeeze lemon juice onto the stain, wait a couple of minutes, rinse, and let dry in the sun; the lemon's acid breaks up the stain, and sunlight has a bleaching effect. (Lemon juice works on cherry-juice-stained skin, too.)

    For big, stubborn stains, soak the fabric in a solution of 1 quart warm water, 1 tablespoon white vinegar, and 1/2 teaspoon clear, mild dishwashing liquid for 15 minutes, then wash as directed. Make extra solution to store in a spray bottle for treating spots.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, July 2011
    More Bright Ideas
  2. Made for Hanging

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    Homemade hangers preserve the shape of tall boots and maximize space. They're created by replacing the knobs on cedar boot trees with large cup hooks, which are screwed into the tops. The trees and boots then hang from a cafe-curtain rod.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
  3. Our Favorite Gardening Gear

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    After decades of weeding, wading, and planting, we dig these work shoes the most. 

    From top: breathable waterproof boots, sturdy clogs with removable foot beds, and all-purpose boots for cold weather. To protect hands, nothing beats Mud's nonslip, machine-washable gloves. 

    Hoser Classic Work Boots $95, muckbootcompany.com; Super-Birki Clogs $79, birki.us; Blundstone 500 $150, zappos.com; the original $6 per pair, by Mud, littlesgoodgloves.com

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, April 2010
  4. Long-Term Care

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    Clothes and accessories stored for a season or longer need protection from light, moisture, and insects. A box filled with acid-free tissue paper, assorted cedar inserts, and dried lavender makes it easy to prepare items as you put them away.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
  5. Surprising Garden Pots: Chimney Pots

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    These stately pedestals, made to fit over a chimney's flue, help prevent drafts and add a distinctive note to rooftops. Though pricey, they also make a grand spot to prop up plants. Choose antique or new pots -- find the latter at masonry yards -- and place a plastic pot liner inside each. (For fit, you may need to trim top of liner, then cut down the side and overlap edges.) We filled ours with purple cordylines, silver tradescantia, and rex begonia vine (Cissus discolor).

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, March 2006
  6. Fill Planters with Packing Peanuts

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    Don't throw out the foam peanuts or bubble packing material the next time you get a box in the mail; put them to use. 

    When filling outdoor planters, sub the packing material for up to half the soil. The plant won't know the difference, the container will be lighter, and you'll use less soil. Place the packing material in a plastic bag at the bottom of the pot, and cover with the soil.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, June 2010
  7. More Home & Garden Ideas