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  1. Good Thing

    Flowers for the Fourth of July

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    Silver echinops (also known as globe thistle) and spiky, steel-blue eryngium (or sea holly) mingle with feathery white flowering astilbe. All can be found in farmers' markets and are easy to grow. Cut stems at an angle, and anchor them in a vase using a flower frog. Finish with astilbe foliage and sparklerlike Queen Anne's lace (if planting your own, skip Daucus carota, an invasive weed; instead, try its better-behaved cousin Ammi majus) to set off those big, booming blossoms.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, July 2011
    More Bright Ideas
  2. Caring for Leather

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    If you love playing polo or riding horses, keep your leather boots and saddles clean and beautiful with these simple steps.

    Boots
    1. Wash with water and a sponge to remove sweat. Let dry.
    2. Polish with cordovan color shoe polish.

    Saddles
    1. Clean with water and glycerin soap after riding to keep leather supple and shiny.
    2. Apply cerasoline to saddle with soft cloth once or twice a month.

    Source
    The Martha Stewart Show, January 2010
  3. Double Stacked

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    Four divided trays, painted orange, become a layered jewelry organizer. Two trays lie flat along the drawer bottom. The remaining two, joined with wood glue, form the top shelf; it is elevated by strips of 1-inch square molding affixed to the inner sides of the drawer.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
  4. Good Thing

    Floral Teas on Display

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    Fragrant floral teas find a handsome home in glass canisters, where their soft hues are on full display.

    Simply fill your favorite jars with colorful varieties of loose tea petals -- we like chamomile, violet, red rose, jasmine, jasmine-scented flowering, and plum berry teas -- and arrange together for a striking counter adornment.

    It's not only an attractive display, but also a convenient reminder of the varieties you have on hand.

    Source
    The Martha Stewart Show, Episode 5128
  5. Botanical Door Border

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    Dusty miller, known for its velvety foliage, is small enough to be pressed in a telephone book. When dried, the leaf fronts turn silvery white, while the backs go gray. Both are on view in figure-eight garlands, which flank a doorway in the style of architectural moldings. 

    The leaves are affixed to plum-colored rice paper and laid under glass in inexpensive clip frames.

    See More Plant-Pressing How-Tos

    How To Build a Plant Press

    Sources
    Clip Frames (23 1/2" by 9 3/4" ), from ikea.com

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, April 2010
  6. Dan Hinckley's Seattle Garden Tour

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    Renowned author and plants expert Dan Hinkley has traveled the globe in search of beautiful and unique plants for his private garden, Windcliff, in Seattle.

    Situated on a bluff overlooking Puget Sound, the diverse garden was first begun only six years ago but has grown quickly in the lush climate of the Pacific Northwest.

    Highlights from the stunning landscape include tiered Asian dogwoods, colorful hydrangeas, and dramatic bamboo, as well as a vegetable garden and greenhouse where Dan grows lettuce, onions, tomatoes, and other crops.

    Source
    The Martha Stewart Show, November 2010
  7. More Home & Garden Ideas