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Crisp Anise Cookies

These cookies are wrapped in the spirit of the season.

  • yield: Makes about 6 dozen

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Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups plus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon coarse salt
  • 2 teaspoons ground anise seeds
  • 4 large eggs, room temperature
  • 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar, plus more for sprinkling

Cook's Note

Cookies will keep, layered between parchment and covered, for up to 1 week.

Directions

  1. Step 1

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Sift flour, baking powder, salt, and anise in a medium bowl. Whisk eggs with a mixer on medium speed. Slowly add sugar, increase speed to high, and whisk until thick and glossy, about 10 minutes. Reduce speed to low, and add flour mixture, whisking until just combined.

  2. Step 2

    Spoon batter into a pastry bag fitted with a 1/2-inch round tip. Pipe 1-inch tapered mounds on baking sheets lined with nonstick baking mats, spacing them 1 inch apart. Bake until firm, 10 to 12 minutes. Let cool on sheets on wire racks.

Source
Martha Stewart Living, December 2008

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Reviews (19)

  • champlin3 6 Dec, 2010

    My Aunt comes from Germany and she would back a big Garbage bag full of these cookeys hers were always so hard I remember and very strong thay would smell the house up as soon as she brought in that bag but I knew it was Christmas then I dont like ligurish but I love the memorys. merry Christmas to everyone

  • freya805 18 Dec, 2008

    i made these according to the directions, except on parchment paper. bad idea. they stuck terribly to the paper. also, i piped them into one inch rounds, but they spread out and were ruined. the ones that survived had amazing flavor, but they were not crisp. they were so delicious in flavor, though, that i will try again!

  • freya805 18 Dec, 2008

    i made these according to the directions, except on parchment paper. bad idea. they stuck terribly to the paper. also, i piped them into one inch rounds, but they spread out and were ruined. the ones that survived had amazing flavor, but they were not crisp. they were so delicious in flavor, though, that i will try again!

  • freya805 18 Dec, 2008

    i made these according to the directions, except on parchment paper. bad idea. they stuck terribly to the paper. also, i piped them into one inch rounds, but they spread out and were ruined. the ones that survived had amazing flavor, but they were not crisp. they were so delicious in flavor, though, that i will try again!

  • cookinincolorado 13 Dec, 2008

    Made these cookies last night according to these directions, and they spread out to where they were flat and very poor flavor and texture. I agree maybe they needed some butter.

  • tqhc 13 Dec, 2008

    This is a great recipe. I did use 1/2 tsp anise extract and 1 tsp anise seed and anise sugar on top. They are light, crisp and delicious. No pastry bag for me, only tsps. They came out the same. This is a keeper.

  • kathy2760 12 Dec, 2008

    usually during our humid summers I will stor cookies with a slice of white bread in the container - it seems to keep them crisp

  • jacco3 11 Dec, 2008

    I have been making these cookies for years and they are our favorites. Since we moved to Florida I have had an impossible time of keeping them crisp! Any suggestions for the lovely HUMID climate?

  • ivahays 11 Dec, 2008

    I use oil, 1/2 tsp unless you like a heavier flavor then adjust. Yummmm

  • dianneholecek 11 Dec, 2008

    If you have anise oil, how much would you use?

  • ivahays 11 Dec, 2008

    1/2 tsp should give you a nice light flavor. I use that amt in another recipe for candy cane twists.

  • wishfulthinking 11 Dec, 2008

    if you use extract instead of the ground anise seeds, how much is the equivalent?

  • ulihelisdi 11 Dec, 2008

    Why would you need a pastry bag, why not just drop a spoonful onto the parchment paper. It would be round and just as pretty. Using raw sugar to sprinkle on the cookie before baking.

  • ivahays 11 Dec, 2008

    Try adding red food coloring to the end of the mix before piping or run some red stripes up the piping bag (inside) before filling and that should give you a cute edge pattern. Maybe even the cookie press gadget would work for different shapes.

  • hollywoodgimp 11 Dec, 2008

    use anise extract instead of the seeds. Great flavor

  • graziela 11 Dec, 2008

    Debylu, you can use Fennel seed, it has that licorice flavor as well.

  • Debylu 11 Dec, 2008

    What could you use instead of anise?

  • euni 11 Dec, 2008

    hi null. I think the sugar would be sprinkled on before baking, otherwise the sugar might fall off after baking. Parchment paper would be fine. I use the paper and the mats interchangeably. Euni in Colorado

  • bigscrapkitty 11 Dec, 2008

    you can always use parchment instead of mats, I prefer it - no washing!
    As for the sugar, I'd imagine you need to sprinkle before baking, or it won't stick. The large crystal sugar would look neat. I'm not sure about this recipe, seems to me it needs some butter. I have a similar recipe for ginger cookies which uses a good bit of butter. If I can find the anise, I'll try these!