No Thanks
Let

Keep In Touch With MarthaStewart.com

Sign up and we'll send inspiration straight to you.

Martha Stewart takes your privacy seriously. To learn more, please read our Privacy Policy.

  1. Paint Swatch Sticks

    Hide

    Long after the last coats have dried on your new paint job, you can still have easy access to the color names and numbers for touch-ups. Save the wooden stirrers you used to mix the paint, let them dry, and then write the names and numbers of the colors on the ends of the sticks. Use a length of twine to bundle the sticks by room. Bundling twine, $4 for 525', by Everbilt, from homedepot.com.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, May 2011
    More Bright Ideas
  2. Our Favorite Gardening Gear

    Hide

    After decades of weeding, wading, and planting, we dig these work shoes the most. 

    From top: breathable waterproof boots, sturdy clogs with removable foot beds, and all-purpose boots for cold weather. To protect hands, nothing beats Mud's nonslip, machine-washable gloves. 

    Hoser Classic Work Boots $95, muckbootcompany.com; Super-Birki Clogs $79, birki.us; Blundstone 500 $150, zappos.com; the original $6 per pair, by Mud, littlesgoodgloves.com

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, April 2010
  3. Squeeze More Room Out of Small Quarters

    Hide

    In the compact laundry workstation and storage area of a small bathroom, the stacked European-style washer-dryer set economizes space. A shelf between units pulls out for folding items fresh from the dryer, then slides out of sight. A matchstick shade lowers all the way to the floor, gracefully hiding the utility area when guests are expected.

    Source
    Organizing Good Things 2005, October 2005
  4. First Aid for Gardeners

    Hide

    The garden is just a slightly tamed wilderness with hazards all its own: It harbors insects that bite, thorns that scratch, and other potential nuisances that may require simple first aid. This basic kit includes alcohol for cleaning wounds, first-aid ointment, cotton balls, bandages, tweezers for thorns and splinters, insect repellent with sunscreen, and, finally, hand salve to soothe and soften your dry skin at the end of the day.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, May 2000
  5. Basic First-Aid Kit

    Hide

    When you need first-aid supplies most, you're usually not in the best frame of mind to search for them. A well-stocked first-aid kit keeps the items you need easy to find. Bandages, adhesive tape, gauze, and scissors are useful. To clean wounds, keep hydrogen peroxide or isopropyl alcohol (and cotton balls or swabs to apply it) on hand as well as antibiotic ointment (check expiration date). A first-aid kit is also a good place to store pain relievers.

    Source
    Organizing Good Things 2004
  6. Good Thing

    How to Keep a Duvet in Place

    Hide

    Although a duvet cover does an admirable job of protecting a comforter from stains, it is notorious for being a shifty character. Keep it and your comforter neatly in place by turning the cover inside out and sewing two pieces of five-inch-long fabric tape to all four corners. Then tie the fabric tape around each corner of the comforter, and sleep tight.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2011
  7. More Home & Garden Ideas