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Polenta with Capocollo, Robiola, and Ramps

This irresistible recipe for polenta with capocollo, robiola, and ramps comes courtesy of chef Mario Batali.

  • Servings: 4
Polenta with Capocollo, Robiola, and Ramps

Source: The Martha Stewart Show, May Spring 2007

Ingredients

  • 1 cup quick-cooking polenta or fine cornmeal
  • 2 tablespoons fresh thyme, leaves
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 24 slices capocollo, sliced paper thin (about 8 ounces)
  • 1 1/2 cups (about 12 ounces) aged robiola cheese
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 20 ramps, trimmed, rinsed, and patted dry

Directions

  1. Bring 5 cups water to a boil in a 4-quart saucepan over medium-high heat. Add polenta in a thin stream, stirring constantly; lower heat to a simmer. Add thyme and honey, and cook, stirring, until polenta is thick, 5 to 7 minutes.

  2. Pour polenta into a 10-by-15-inch baking sheet and smooth the top with the back of a spoon or spatula; let cool completely.

  3. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Butter a 9-by-13-inch baking dish; set aside.

  4. Invert polenta onto a cutting board and cut into six 5-by-9-inch rectangles. Cut each rectangle in half lengthwise. Place 1 piece of polenta in prepared baking dish. Top with 1 slice capocollo, followed by 2 tablespoons robiola cheese. Repeat process in baking dish with remaining ingredients, slightly overlapping polenta.

  5. Transfer baking sheet to oven and bake until heated through and golden brown on top, about 20 minutes.

  6. Meanwhile, in a 10-inch skillet, heat olive oil over high heat until smoking. Add ramps and cook, stirring, until softened, 2 to 3 minutes. Keep warm until ready to use.

  7. Remove baking dish from oven. Transfer each portion to a serving plate. Divide ramps evenly among the 4 plates. Serve immediately.

Reviews (1)

  • sloracer 1 Mar, 2008

    It would help to explain the terms for items not usually used in some areas. I'm referring to Capocollo, Robiola, and Ramps. ???

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