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Lemon-Glazed Candied-Ginger Cookies

94

Candied ginger brings a sweet heat to these crisp, golden cookies, while lemon gives the glaze a distinct zing.

  • Yield: Makes 6 dozen

Source: Martha Stewart Living, June 2008

Ingredients

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for surface
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • Salt
  • 6 ounces (3/4 cup) unsalted butter, softened
  • 1 cup packed light-brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped candied ginger
  • 1 large egg
  • 2 tablespoons pure vanilla extract
  • 4 cups confectioners' sugar
  • 2 tablespoons finely grated lemon zest
  • 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 1/3 cup water

Directions

  1. Sift flour, baking powder, and 3/4 teaspoon salt into a bowl. Cream butter and brown sugar with a mixer on medium speed until pale and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Add ginger, and beat for 2 minutes. Beat in egg and vanilla until well combined. Add flour mixture, and then beat on medium-low speed until dough just comes together.

  2. Shape dough into two 1-inch-thick disks. Wrap tightly in plastic, and refrigerate for at least 1 hour (or up to 3 days).

  3. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Roll out 1 disk on a lightly floured surface to 1/4 inch thickness, and cut out 2-inch circles. Place the rounds 1/2 inch apart on parchment-lined baking sheets. Roll out and cut scraps. Refrigerate rounds for 10 minutes.

  4. Bake, rotating sheets halfway through, until cookies are set and edges are light gold, 12 to 14 minutes. Transfer parchment with cookies to wire racks. Let cool completely. Repeat with remaining dough. (Cookies can be stored for up to 3 days.)

  5. Whisk confectioners' sugar, lemon zest and juice, honey, water, and a pinch of salt in a bowl until smooth. Drizzle glaze over the cooled cookies. Let stand until glaze is set, at least 20 minutes.

Cook's Notes

Drizzling the rounds just before serving ensures a shiny glaze and crisp cookies. For softer cookies, let the glaze set overnight. (The glaze's shimmer will dull.)

Reviews Add a comment

  • anniequinn
    8 DEC, 2011
    The recipe in the magazine says roll out to 1/4 inch thick
    Reply
  • 27PurpleRoses
    30 JAN, 2011
    I don't think this reicpe is accurate enough.-- says to create 1" rolls then roll the dough out to 1"
    Reply
  • Anarie
    5 JUN, 2010
    Works well as a slice and bake log as PPs suggested. I also think 2T of vanilla is way too much. I loooove vanilla, but here it mutes the ginger. I did add ground ginger, and if I make these again I'll increase that to 1T or more. I ended up with 5 doz.
    Reply
  • Anarie
    5 JUN, 2010
    Works well as a slice
    Reply
  • Anarie
    5 JUN, 2010
    The dough is extremely soft because of all that melted butter. That's why you MUST chill it. Even then I think it would be soft to roll; I made a slice
    Reply
  • mykele
    4 APR, 2010
    kntzv, I owe everyone an apology, I do know better and cannot figure out my erring on this one...........I am a veteran at baking and cooking and really do know better....thank you for the reminder .....Mykele
    Reply
  • kritzv
    3 APR, 2010
    The problem is thinking that 1 T equals 1 oz. of butter. Actually 1 T = 1/2 oz of butter. 8 T of butter = 1/2 cup of butter = 4 oz of butter. Therefore 12 T of butter = 3/4 C = 6 oz of butter. This is one of the reasons pros bakers use weight measurements and not volume...Vic
    Reply
  • mykele
    3 APR, 2010
    Check again Ceege...8 oz. = 1/2 cup or one stick of butter. It takes 2 sticks for one cup. Read your wrapping paper again please. Mykele
    Reply
  • Ceege
    2 APR, 2010
    To Mykele 6 oz. is 3/4 cup. 8 oz. is 1 cup. 4 oz. is 1/2 cup. So in order to get the 3/4 cup of butter needed, you would use 1/2 and 1/4 cup. If you are actually using butter, all you need to do is count the number of tablespoons marked on the paper wrapping. You would need 1 1/2 sticks of butter for this recipe
    Reply
  • mykele
    2 APR, 2010
    Am I the only one who questions the butter quantity? half a cup is 8 ounces sooo 6 ounces is not 3/4 cup but 2 tablespoons less than half a cup or 6 ounces less 2 ounces of butter. No wonder you had sticky dough. The idea for freezing in ziplock bags is GREAT. thank you mykele
    Reply