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Under 30 Minutes

Hearty Garlic Greens

Boston-based chef Jody Adams's favorite hearty autumn greens include Swiss chard, Tuscan kale, and mustard greens, but any combination of autumn greens will work just as well.

  • Prep:
  • Total Time:
  • Servings: 8
Hearty Garlic Greens

Photography: Kirsten Strecker

Source: Body+Soul, November/December 2006

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pounds autumn hearty greens, well washed, stems removed, and sliced into 3-inch strips
  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 8 cloves garlic, sliced paper-thin
  • 1 pound spinach
  • 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes

Directions

  1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Drop hearty greens into water and blanch for 4 minutes. Immediately plunge blanched greens into a bowl of ice-cold water to stop the cooking. Drain, squeeze dry, and set aside.

  2. Heat oil and garlic in a large skillet over medium-low heat. Cook until the garlic is golden around the edges, 8 to 10 minutes. With a slotted spoon, remove garlic from skillet; set aside.

  3. Raise heat to high. Add hearty greens and cook for an additional 5 minutes. Add spinach; season with salt and red pepper flakes to taste. Cook until spinach wilts, stirring frequently (about a minute). Return garlic to pan and stir. The greens can be served immediately or at room temperature.

Cook's Note

Blanching does not actually cook the greens but softens their texture, while shocking them in cold water keeps their color strong and vibrant.

Reviews (7)

  • macwhitten 2 Sep, 2012

    This is a great side that still works even if you don't have all the various greens. I made it with only green kale and spinach. Still wonderful and since I was the only one eating it - it made just enough. I'll see how it fares as a leftover today.
    Remember that greens really cook down and do not yield very much finished produce - so get way more that you think you will need.

  • macwhitten 2 Sep, 2012

    This is a great side that still works even if you don't have all the various greens. I made it with only green kale and spinach. Still wonderful and since I was the only one eating it - it made just enough. I'll see how it fares as a leftover today.
    Remember that greens really cook down and do not yield very much finished produce - so get way more that you think you will need.

  • GiovannaAlvaro 24 Sep, 2011

    Oh, and I must say, this is a side dish we always had. So delicious, I would even take it to school in a sandwich - alone.

  • GiovannaAlvaro 24 Sep, 2011

    You may want to fry the garlic no longer than 5 minutes if you have sliced them so thin. To repsond to schmoole, you remove the garlic from the pan while you cook the greens in the oil to avoid garlic from softening. Garlic's awesome when crispy (but not burned).

  • schmoole 9 Dec, 2008

    Why do you want to avoid cooking your garlic? Do you really massage your greens instead of cooking them? Why?

  • contributors_marthastewart_com_norahs 24 Jun, 2008

    I've made a similar dish, but added a few raisins and a tablespoon of orange juice concentrate. Delicious!

  • sueko 23 Jun, 2008

    While I find most of the recipes from MS publications at best pseudo-healthy, this one really is pretty healthy! I'm going to try it without cooking the greens, to get the full nutrition from them (you salt the greens, let them sit 5 minutes, then sort of massage them until they reach that wilted consistency cooking gives them) and marinating the garlic slices in olive oil to avoid cooking them as well.

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