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Yorkshire Pudding

Yorkshire-pudding batter must be very cold before baking. Make it a day ahead, and refrigerate.

  • servings: 8

Ingredients

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 6 large eggs
  • 2 1/2 cups milk
  • Pan drippings from Prime Rib

Directions

  1. Step 1

    Sift together flour and salt; set aside. In a medium bowl, whisk together eggs and milk. Add flour mixture, and whisk until combined. Cover with plastic; chill in the refrigerator for at least 4 hours, or overnight.

  2. Step 2

    When prime rib has finished cooking, raise oven temperature to 425 degrees. After roasting pan has been deglazed, pour 1/4 cup reserved pan drippings back into pan. Heat pan and drippings on top of the stove until very hot, about 5 minutes. Remove batter from refrigerator, and shake or whisk well; quickly pour into hot roasting pan.

  3. Step 3

    Bake until crisp and golden, 20 to 30 minutes. Serve warm with prime rib.

Source
Martha Stewart Living, December/January 1996/1997

Reviews (5)

  • 22 Dec, 2011

    Amazing....we have made this for years and it is the best recipe I have tried. Perfect and fluffy with rib roast.

  • 22 Dec, 2010

    I'd hate to have my prime rib sitting out for 30 minutes while the pudding is being made. I don't think it would last that long around any of the men in my family anyway. Is there a qiucker way, perhaps dividing the mixture among smaller pans or making muffins? Or "cheating" with the drippings and using beef stock or removing drippings from prime rib before it's done and starting the pudding in time to have it ready with the meat.

  • 6 Jun, 2008

    I made them in the muffin tins and these are great! Especially with gravy made with the pan juices of the prime rib....excellent! My family wasn't too sure about Yorkshire pudding (they had never heard of it), but once they took a bite, they were hooked!

  • 13 Jan, 2008

    This was my first time EVER making Yorkies as my british husband endearly refers to them. Well, if a medal was being awarded, I won it that evening! This recipe is sooooo easy and made me look amazing. My roast didn't have enough to make the drippings part so I put olive oil instead, but can only imagine the next attempt if successful with drippings will be even more award winning!

  • 21 Dec, 2007

    This is the version of Yorkshire Pudding my grandmother always made -- wonderful! I have also made a popover-type recipe similar to the one featured on this site. The Yorskhire Pudding popovers are very nice if you want a sort of individualized serving or to fill it with something. They are very nice because they are more 'crunchy' or crispy in texture, having baked on all sides in a muffin or popover-type tin. Both are absolutely delicious!