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Blueberry-and-Cream Cookies

This one-of-a-kind cookie recipe is courtesy of pastry chef Christina Tosi of Momofuku Milk Bar.

  • Yield: Makes 14 cookies
Blueberry-and-Cream Cookies

Source: The Martha Stewart Show

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/8 teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 cup (8 ounces) Plugra European-style unsalted butter
  • 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons light-brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup glucose
  • 1 large egg
  • 3/4 cup dried blueberries
  • 1/2 cup plus 1/3 cup Milk Crumbs

Directions

  1. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper; set aside.

  2. In a large bowl, mix together flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt; set aside. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment mix together butter, sugars, and glucose until well combined. Add egg and mix until well combined.

  3. Add flour mixture and mix until well combined. Add blueberries and milk crumbs and mix until well combined. Using an ice cream scoop about 2 1/8 inches in diameter, scoop dough into balls and place about 2 inches apart on prepared baking sheets.

  4. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Transfer baking sheets to refrigerator until dough is chilled, about 15 minutes. Transfer baking sheets to oven and bake, rotating pans halfway through baking, until cookies are golden brown and tops begin to crackle, about 15 minutes. Transfer cookies to a wire rack to cool.

Reviews (90)

  • mentos1223 22 Jul, 2013

    Oh. I understand well the recipe. How will we do it. You clearly explain it well. Thanks for it.

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  • Cupcakegirl55 24 Apr, 2013

    I made these cookies for the second time today. The first time I made them, they were absolute perfection! Today, they practically melted on the pan. They were so flat they looked like crepes. I used actual glucose the second time around instead of corn syrup. I wonder if that's what made them so flat? I double checked and I didn't skip any ingredients or add the wrong amount. Ah well, I'll try again tomorrow with the corn syrup again. When you do these cookies right, they're AMAZING!

  • Cupcakegirl55 12 Jan, 2013

    These were fantastic! I substituted light corn syrup for the glucose and used regular butter instead of Plugra, and they came out amazing! I had to add a little more white chocolate to the Milk Crumbs than the recipe called for. Not sure why that happened, but I couldn't get everything coated with the amount listed in the recipe. Also, it might seem like the recipe uses a lot of salt, but the salt actually really adds something extra yummy, so don't cut it down. I highly recommend making these!

  • Gwynster 9 Feb, 2012

    I found glucose at Michael's in the Wilton section. Interestingly, the only ingredient is corn syrup. It's much thicker than Karo syrup but I'll bet you could still do the substitution.

    This was such a fun cookie to bake with a great taste -- a very nice change. Since I have the ingredients I'm going to measure out a few of the things and weigh them so I don't have to mess with all those measuring spoons and cups. next time.

    The blueberries were expensive -- I had to sell my dog! ;-)

  • mdv24 6 Feb, 2012

    Where do you buy glucose?

  • Samj530 7 Sep, 2010

    I made some subs for the items that are hard to find. Corn syrup for glucose

  • Samj530 7 Sep, 2010

    I made some subs for the items that are hard to find. Corn syrup for glucose

  • Samj530 7 Sep, 2010

    I made some subs for the items that are hard to find. Corn syrup for glucose

  • Samj530 7 Sep, 2010

    I made some subs for the items that are hard to find. Corn syrup for glucose

  • zenyatta 7 Jul, 2010

    I am just a small town girl, and although I love these receipes, most ingredients are impossible to get around here. You should make substitutions for us plain old cooks.

  • lecocolate 7 Jul, 2010

    The chef mentions one could use fresh blueberries also, but wouldn't it change the texture of the cookie due to their very watery nature? I wonder if corn syrup could be used to replace the glucose, but it is thinner.

  • pdiller 6 Jul, 2010

    Where do you buy glucose? Is it something that can be made from sugar?

  • gramman 6 Jul, 2010

    These are the best. I make them several times a year to great applause. They are time consuming, but worth it! Also had them at Momofuko's - the recipe is true to the originals.

  • wendyso 27 Jun, 2010

    These were delicious. Thank you!

  • SThomas215 15 Jun, 2010

    The ingredients are inconvenient to obtain, especially in small towns.

  • citygirl2761 12 Mar, 2010

    Glucose is sold by Wilton - so try cake supply stoers or Michael's.

    Plugra is carried at specialty food stores

  • mdv24 26 Feb, 2010

    Where do you get glucose?

  • mdv24 26 Feb, 2010

    Where do you get glucose?

  • sumom 26 Feb, 2010

    What is Plugra European-style unsalted butter? Can I substitute? Where do I get it?
    Also, where do I get glucose? What is it?

  • melnb 25 Feb, 2010

    I've made these twice now. SO GOOD!!!! Creamy and full of flavor. The milk crumbs are easy to put together and the recipe it's self may sound complicated, but it's really easy too. I also used less salt. Don't overbake them...they cook up while they cool. Enjoy!

  • MrsStephens1 24 Feb, 2010

    These are incredible. I can't imagine why someone wouldn't LOVE these. I made the Milk Crumbs in advance, so it was pretty quick to put the rest of the recipe together the next day. Only change -- I followed recipe exactly except used 1 tsp salt instead of 2 tsp.
    For those who said it had an off taste, I wonder if they used GOOD white chocolate. I used Callebaut. Expensive, but sooo worth it. Will make again and again....

  • melnb 21 Feb, 2010

    Lizzy0541... the recipe calls for a 1/2 cup plus 1/3 cup of milk crumbs (recipe is included for the milk crumbs) is 1/2 1/2 cup = 1 cup which is too much. So 1/2 1/3 is correct

  • shoshanamazal 21 Feb, 2010

    I'm so glad that someone suggested using white chips because I've been looking for over a year for powdered milk and haven't yet found it here in Israel. Can powdered coffee cream be substituted or baby formula for powdered milk? Shoshana

  • Lizzy0541 20 Feb, 2010

    These sound scrumpsous and this is the second receipe from Momofuko's they just had "Crack Pie" receipe from there in the paper. Could someone explain the 1/2 c. plus 1/3 c. Milk Crumbs to me? Is it 1/2 pr 1/3 cup?
    Lizzy42

  • Anarie 20 Feb, 2010

    And for those who are complaining that the recipe is too complicated... This is what professional recipes are like. Just because I don't have the time, talent, or supplies to paint a portrait, should I criticize a website that shows how pro artists do it? If you think it's too hard for you, don't try it, but try to be glad that it's available for those who want a challenge. Variety is the spice of life.

  • Anarie 20 Feb, 2010

    Also, the amount of water in salted and unsalted butter is different. Substituting will change the texture of the product, not just the saltiness.

  • melnb 20 Feb, 2010

    The reason you should bake with unsalted butter, then add salt is so you can be in control of how much salt goes into your recipe. You should only use salted butter for things like your your toast.

  • marygs 20 Feb, 2010

    wouldn't you say that #1. 2 tsp of salt is excessive and #2. why use unsalted butter and #3 why not use regular butter and NO salt??????

  • SatinStitch 20 Feb, 2010

    You can use corn syrup in place of the glucose if you can't find it, and it will work fine. The point is to use an inverted sugar- one that won't crystalize again like regular sugar.

  • SatinStitch 20 Feb, 2010

    You can use corn syrup in place of the glucose if you can't find it, and it will work fine. The point is to use an inverted sugar- one that won't crystalize again like regular sugar.

  • leannelerner 20 Feb, 2010

    If you click on milk crumbs in the recipe, it will give you the recipe to make milk crumbs. I believe I bought glucose at Michael's Craft Store a year ago when I first made these amazing cookies. They're beautiful, and nobody has ever had anything like them!

  • shawirko 20 Feb, 2010

    This looks good but maybe someone can help answer a couple of questions.
    What is milk crumbs and where can you buy as well as glucose I have never heard of putting this in a recipe

  • bossraines 20 Feb, 2010

    Although I haven't tried making these cookies yet, I wanted to comment on the posts that are disappointed with the ingredients. I think it's great to find something out of the ordinary here! Baking IS a science and it should be fun to experiment! Thanks Martha!

  • MaxineH 4 May, 2009

    I made these cookies yesterday and they were incredible. Everyone enjoyed them. I did end up adding an extra 1/4 cup of blue berries. Next time I think I'm gonna try it with fresh blue berries.

  • loopylamb 19 Mar, 2009

    Made these today. I think they're really tasty. I love the tang of the milk crumbs in them. They don't taste enough like blueberries for me though. I might add more berries if I make them again.
    I used the following substitutions-
    corn syrup for the glucose
    unsalted butter for the European-style butter
    1 tsp salt instead of 2 tsp
    I also made the cookies a smaller size. I used a rounded tablespoon of dough for each, and baked about 11 minutes.

  • rettalee 16 Mar, 2009

    Made these cookies with a few changes. Used corn syrup diluted with 1/2 water for glucose. Used regular unsalted butter,1 tsp. of salt and chopped up white chocolate chips for the milk crumbles. Cookies came out great everybody enjoyed them.

  • I-heart-martha 2 Mar, 2009

    very interesting texture and flavor. I agree that salt should be reduced. i substituted light corn syrup for glucose. my roommates were unsure about them, but they kept coming back for more. the cookies don't seem done when first coming out of the oven, but they assume the right texture after cooling. don't overbake, just a light golden color. would be fantastic with dried tart cherries as well.

  • kris_hw 28 Feb, 2009

    Today the cookies are actually really good, and they don't have the tangy aftertaste anymore. They're much more fudgey but still soft. Don't bake them too much, just till there's a light golden ring around the edges. Good cookies in the end, but I don't think I will make them again unless I have a request in the family, they're not spectacular.

  • kris_hw 27 Feb, 2009

    I made these cookies today, and only used a pinch of salt, regular fat butter, and substituted half the amount of glucose with corn syrup. I didn't like the taste of the cookies, they had a bit of an odd flavor with a tangy aftertaste. A plus side to the cookies is they stayed very soft and fluffy after they cooled. I made the second batch a much thinner size and they seemed to taste better when they weren't as thick.

  • pikachusuzy 26 Feb, 2009

    I am sure you could use a brand like land o lakes sweet cream unsalted butter, I have used Plugra in the past, it is a very rich butter due to it's higher fat - 2% more than normal butter, or maybe you could find a local dairy that makes their own butter with a slightly higher fat content.

  • pikachusuzy 26 Feb, 2009

    I am sure you could use a brand like land o lakes sweet cream unsalted butter, I have used Plugra in the past, it is a very rich butter due to it's higher fat - 2% more than normal butter, or maybe you could find a local dairy that makes their own butter with a slightly higher fat content.

  • kat010 22 Feb, 2009

    you can find glucose at michael's in the cake decorating section :)

  • lovestennis 22 Feb, 2009

    Thank you for sharing this recipe with us. However, I have problems with the ingredients...glucose. Could I use "corn syrup" instead? Also, do I have to use only Plugra European-style unsalted butter? Can we substitute something else for Milk Crumbs? The recipe is just too much work. Thanks to Pastry Chef Christina Tosi for the recipe but it may not be flexible for some of us to bake these cookies. Thanks Martha!

  • lovestennis 22 Feb, 2009

    Thank you for sharing this recipe with us. However, I have problems with the ingredients...glucose. Could I use "corn syrup" instead? Also, do I have to use only Plugra European-style unsalted butter? Can we substitute something else for Milk Crumbs? The recipe is just too much work. Thanks to Pastry Chef Christina Tosi for the recipe but it may not be flexible for some of us to bake these cookies. Thanks Martha!

  • sochmom 22 Feb, 2009

    I'm up for the challenge of making these cookies - they look fabulous and worth the effort. The problem is finding the glucose. I've been to Whole Foods, the health food store, the gourmet shop, the cooking store, and two major grocers. No one carries it.

  • basha25 22 Feb, 2009

    While I appreciate a pastry chef sharing a recipie with us, after reading it, this is not for me. I make many Martha cookie recipies,all great, most with ingredients on hand. I've been baking for 50 years, but I would need a class on these ingredients.

  • GwenHex 22 Feb, 2009

    well, i don't know. when i bake, i don't have my stuff measured out for me or cameras watching my every move or people supplying me with the ingredients. maybe that fact makes it a little hard to do this recipe.

  • mykele 21 Feb, 2009

    The salt just may be coarse salt and not regular table salt so one
    would use twice as much for coarse salt. They just forget to
    give the correct salt. This does indeed appear to be a labor
    intensive recipe.

  • craftncook 21 Feb, 2009

    This recipe caught me eye........Then I read I need European style butter, glucose????? And then I have to make milk crumbs...whatever the heck they are......Let's get real here, this sounds more like nuclear science, not relaxing and making a batch of cookies...........This gets DELETED!!!!!!!!

  • asaylor 21 Feb, 2009

    Thanks for the comments on the salt, maybe 1/2 tsp? And I don't see what is SO complicated about these cookies. I think the milk crumbs sound awesome, and could be used in lots of different desserts. And for comparison on complicatedness (is that a word?) I just made some cupcakes from the Betty Crocker website, that uses their boxed mix and canned frosting, and it still took 2 hours because of all the additional stuff you had to do! They were well worth it (key lime pie cupcakes).

  • Perbacco 21 Feb, 2009

    Made them last night. The salt quantity is definitely wrong. I put only 1 tsp and they came out salty. Use no more than 1 pinch. Milk crumbs are easy to make. Anyway, to my taste the final result is not worth all the trouble
    Can someone tell me what kind of ovens you use to bake cookies: conventional or fan forced?

  • monkeyshine 21 Feb, 2009

    My version of this would be: cookie mix in a bag, cream cheese, and dried blueberries. Might need a time or two to get it right, but sounds just as good, and a lot less complicated.

  • beijingPTA 20 Feb, 2009

    Eh, I'm with Cupcake. C'mon Martha...back to reality. Besides, this cookie doesn't end up being "spectacular" enough to merit all the troubled ingredients.

  • Cupcake411 20 Feb, 2009

    I'm so disappointed with this recipe. Why on earth would they post such a ridiculously complicated recipe? In a time when many folks are working 2-3 jobs just to make ends meet, they post a recipe calling for glucose and "milk crumbs"? C'mon, Martha, get real!

  • hairyandagi_tj 20 Feb, 2009

    I just remembered that a craft supply store that also have a baking section might have it also, or you can substitute it with light corn syrup.

  • hairyandagi_tj 20 Feb, 2009

    glucose is pretty easy to find (mostly in baking supply shops). If you read the recipe carefully, there is a link to make the milk crumbs. Milk crumbs isn't something u can buy. I'm assuming that the chef created it for this cookie recipe so that it is unique.

  • audge 20 Feb, 2009

    I tried getting glucose at my local cake store but they didn't have it. :( I found dried blueberries at WalMart of all places! I thought they might have the glucose cuz they do sell Wilton's stuff but no, they don't have it. Just a little info to share. I figure if they sell hundreds of these cookies a day they are worth trying!!!

  • Queenlalisa 20 Feb, 2009

    The picture looks yummy, but I don't have glucose or milk crumbs on hand. So I probably won't try them.

  • gramman 20 Feb, 2009

    Christina Tosi, the pastry chef, said in her demo that fresh blueberries could be substituted in. I do think that 2 teaspoons salt is too much.

  • justLaurel 20 Feb, 2009

    I agree. These cookies look good but are way too complicated unless you're having company and if that's the case you'd probably spend the time on something a little more showy.

  • skyspirit464 20 Feb, 2009

    You need to click on "Milk Crumbs" in the above recipe to find out how to make them. It is another recipe. This is a rather complicated cookie recipe!

  • mayraa 20 Feb, 2009

    Looks good and would like to make them but need substitutes for the glucose and milk crumbs

  • cjcugliani 20 Feb, 2009

    Glugose is not Karo syrup, but in some instances you can substitute. Try Michaels or any cake/baking supply stores.

  • Emmalee 20 Feb, 2009

    So do you use 1/2 cup plus 1/3 cup dried milk to the mixture under step # 3? And is glucose Karo syrup?

  • birkiegirl01 20 Feb, 2009

    Fresh are even more rare than dried. Itn n s really amazing what you end up missing when living abroad, I have been here almost 9 years and blueberries in any way, shape or form are number 1 on my list!

  • scgross 20 Feb, 2009

    birkiegirl01: the recipe calls for dried blueberries, not fresh. Maybe try getting those?

  • QueenFrostine 20 Feb, 2009

    No, it's more like a liquid goo. It's a bit thicker than corn syrup. They show and talk about it at around 2:25 in the video.

  • birkiegirl01 20 Feb, 2009

    I am living in Spain and blueberries are few and far between in fresh form. Has anyone tried using frozen ones?? I have found frozen and use them in muffins, etc and would love to try the cookies here but.... Any suggestions??

  • birkiegirl01 20 Feb, 2009

    I am living in Spain and blueberries are few and far between in fresh form. Has anyone tried using frozen ones?? I have found frozen and use them in muffins, etc and would love to try the cookies here but.... Any suggestions??

  • srupp 20 Feb, 2009

    My comment was truncated. Pulgra can be found at Trader Joe's and other upscale stores. It has a lower water content and is richer tasting. Substituting regular butter may change the result, but not appreciably.

  • Cakegirl20 20 Feb, 2009

    The "milk crumbs" are just nonfat dry milk and other ingredients mixed together and baked to from into crumbly bits that you put into the cookie batter.

  • angiekat29 20 Feb, 2009

    Those look so yummy. Excellent idea with the milk crumbs! Can't wait to try this one!

  • srupp 20 Feb, 2009

    You can be taken to the recipe for 'milk crumbs' by clicking on the blue link.

    Plugrn n n n is a brand name of a European style butter (from a U.S. creamery), that contains more butterfat

  • goodiemaker 20 Feb, 2009

    harribob -- the milk crumb mixture (dry milk, flour, sugar, etc.) is on the video and is baked separately and then added to the recipe. After reading all the comments, i think I will try this recipe. At first I thought it was too much work and time with a busy weekend coming up but now I'm thinking I'll get that glucose today at Joann's! Thanks!

  • ivahays 20 Feb, 2009

    Milk crumbs are explained if you click on the light blue highlighted word !!!

  • harribob 20 Feb, 2009

    I notice the recipe calls for milk crumbs. What are they?

  • connielee54 20 Feb, 2009

    I want to make these and appreciate the helpful comments. Of those who made them where did you get the Plugra-European butter or did you just use "regular" unsalted butter?

  • gramman 15 Feb, 2009

    I agree that 2 teaspoons salt is too much - leaves a salty taste. I had the originals at Momofukus in NYC and they weren't salty. I will cut back on the salt next time I make them. But they are worth the steps to make! I used a #20 scoop and got 16 cookies.

  • supanpink 5 Feb, 2009

    Sorry!! I only used a pinch of SALT not sugar.

  • supanpink 5 Feb, 2009

    These looked so good I had to make them. I made them according to the recipe, but I used only a pinch of sugar. I used a small scoop that made 39 cookies and they took 11 minutes to bake. Everyone loved them.

  • ashleyjewelry 3 Feb, 2009

    Seriously worth the effort! Possibly the best cookies I've ever made. I'm waiting on my husband to decide that one!

  • snoofers1 1 Feb, 2009

    Recipe says 375 degrees.

  • momadahl 31 Jan, 2009

    I thought the cookies were a bit salty. What do you think? Is the recipe correct requesting '2 teaspoons salt'?

  • dramatoad 31 Jan, 2009

    I just took the first tray of cookies out of the oven and they took forever to cook! Before baking I even popped in a thermometer to make sure the oven temp was exactly 325. I used every ingrediant exactly. I didn't keep track, but it was at least 30 minutes. I had chilled the first batch 20 min. Could that have added all that extra time? I took the second tray out of the fridge early.... it's been 10 min, and they have just barely begun to cook down. The recipi made 8 ice cream scoop size balls, so the size was fairly close. Another 5 min and the 2nd tray seems to be baking a little faster........ but no way are they 8-10 min cookies! (You can buy the glucose in Michael's w your 40% off coupon.)

  • kona2008 29 Jan, 2009

    can you buy these online?

  • ragdali 29 Jan, 2009

    You can always add 1-2 tbsp and bake a test batch of 1-2 cookies, if they aren't soft enough for your taste add a little bit more until you get the consistency you like. I've also used honey and agave nectar as well (also sold in natural food stores) - if you want something a little lower on the glycemic scale. Both work the same. Hope that helps you!

  • ragdali 29 Jan, 2009

    Most natural food stores carry it too. Some wine making supply stores also carry it. I've used corn syrup in cookies a lot, i'm sure it would be an ok substitution. Usually about 2 tbsps is good for 1 batch of cookies.

    continued..

  • ragdali 29 Jan, 2009

    Most natural food stores carry it too. Some wine making supply stores also carry it. I've used corn syrup in cookies a lot, i'm sure it would be an ok substitution. Usually about 2 tbsps is good for 1 batch of cookies.

    continued..

  • 618eileen 29 Jan, 2009

    love4baking-
    Not sure about that substitution. Glucose ($3-4 for 12oz.) is sold at Michael Crafts, Joann Fabrics, AC Moore and any where else Wilton products are sold.(Wilton.com too)

  • love4baking 29 Jan, 2009

    Can corn syrup be substituted for glucose? Glucose isn't readily available. It is not used that often in everyday cooking to justify buying it.

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