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Alfajores

These alfajores cookies are courtesy of blogger Matt Armendariz of mattbites.com.

  • yield: Makes about 30

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Ingredients

  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar
  • 2 large eggs, room temperature
  • 3/4 cup milk
  • 1/4 cup freshly squeezed orange juice
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • Store-bought dulce de leche, cajeta, or jam
  • Confectioners' sugar, for serving (optional)

Directions

  1. Step 1

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper or nonstick baking mats; set aside.

  2. Step 2

    In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, and salt; set aside.

  3. Step 3

    In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream together butter and sugar on medium speed until light and fluffy, 1 to 2 minutes. Add eggs, one at a time, and continue mixing until well combined, about 1 minute. Working in batches, add flour mixture; mix until well combined. Add milk, orange juice, and vanilla; continue mixing until a dough forms, 1 to 2 minutes.

  4. Step 4

    Using a tablespoon or a small ice cream scoop, drop dough onto prepared baking sheets, about 2 inches apart. Transfer to oven and bake, rotating baking sheets halfway through baking, until golden, 10 to 14 minutes. Transfer cookies to a wire rack until completely cool.

  5. Step 5

    When cookies have cooled completely, spread the bottoms of half of the cookies with dulche de leche, cajeta, or jam; sandwich together with remaining cookies. Store in an airtight container for up to 2 days. Just before serving, lightly sprinkle with confectioners' sugar, if desired.

Source
The Martha Stewart Show, September Summer 2008

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Reviews (41)

  • klaus_90 16 Dec, 2013

    These were delicious! easy to make and healthy thanks alot .
    soigner Hemorroides Externe

  • virginiamfc 10 Mar, 2012

    roll them over grated coconut...are delicious

  • marycelcz 27 Aug, 2010

    I also believe that Alfanjores are originally from Peru

  • vjbobo 6 Jul, 2010

    These were delicious! I substituted a condensed milk, bittersweet chocolate, butter

  • MarlaMeridith 5 Jul, 2010

    We love Matt and his Alfajores cookies!

  • gines 30 Jun, 2010

    valentina: they are alfajores!! maybe not the one you tried, I?Ǭ

  • auntjemima 30 Jun, 2010

    So all the dulce de leche is is brown condensed milk? What a fancy name for something so odd....

  • rock63roll64 30 Jun, 2010

    HAVE NOT TRIED MAKING THESE BUT WILL SOON. IF YOU CHOOSE TO BOIL THE SWEETENED CONDENSED MILK (ABOUT 21/2-3 HRS)..MAKE SURE YOU LET IT COOL DOWN BEFORE OPENING THE CAN....... VERY IMPORTANT!! THANKS AGAIN FOR A WONDERFUL EASY RECIPE!!

  • Valentina134 30 Jun, 2010

    the real alfajores are made with corn starch and all purpose flour...this recipe is not for alfajores...i would say it is for something else...

  • evesita49 30 Jun, 2010

    For those of you who cannot find "dulce de leche", you can get a can of condensed milk and put it in the pressure cooker (with water of course) for almost an hour. When you open the can you will see that it looks brown. That is the "dulce de leche".

  • anyjob 1 Mar, 2010

    I had never tasted an alfajor until I went to Monterrey, Mexico. A friend gave me a box of some. OMG were they good!! I fell in love. They were from a company called bits'nbites. Luckily I found their website bitsnbites.com.mx so I can get my fix :D

    But I'm going to try this recipe for sure! That way I can have them whenever I want.

  • pinpuma 31 Jan, 2009

    These came out great, the only tough part is trying top be consistent with the size of the cookies. I brought these to a friend's party and all the kids at the party liked them, as did the adults.

  • rsvoboda 14 Jan, 2009

    I made the dulce de leche for the first time and made extra to put on cheesecake. Wow was it a hit. The next time I boil the cans I will prepare double. My family complimented me for the great taste and all I did was simmer water for 3 hours! Easy enough for a child to do!

  • Trachea 9 Jan, 2009

    Making dulce de leche is extremely easy and inexpensive. Just boil a can of condensed milk for 3 hours. Make sure the can is always covered with water otherwise it can explode. Once finished, just open the can and enjoy. Also you can add 1tspn of vanilla to finished product.

  • Trachea 9 Jan, 2009

    I am from Argentina. Alfajores are a traditional Argentine cookie which can be filled with either jams or dulce de leche. The alfajores in Argentina oftentimes have shredded coconut along the outside or a sugar glaze.

  • danicr 6 Jan, 2009

    actually alfajores are a traditional arabian sweet, enjoy from spain to many many latinamerican countries, I know cause I live in Costa Rica, and here we also enjoy alfajores, and find them anyway!

  • EricalovesJohn 4 Jan, 2009

    This recipe is originally from Peru not Argentina

  • Gary48 4 Jan, 2009

    I love this cookie. They taste as beautifull as they look. I found the dough easy to work with. I used the dulce de leche in a can. It was easy to find and taste Very Good. This one will be in my cookie box!!

  • kaarle 3 Jan, 2009

    Vicki370 Thank you for your answer to my dilemma. I will start by boiling the condensed sweetened milk first.

  • sgrenier 2 Jan, 2009

    Just watched the video on making the alfajores and noticed that he said 1 1/2 cups of sugar; however, the printed recipe calls for 1 1/4 cups. Which is the correct amount?

  • RandaPrince 2 Jan, 2009

    I made alfajores a few years ago for a presentation on the food of Argentina in my Spanish class. They turned out great, and they quickly disappeared in a roomful of college students (my teacher, who is Mexican and has been to Argentina, even loved them -- yay!). But I made the dulce de leche from scratch -- I didn't know I could just go into Safeway and buy it in a can. And I had the heat too low. It took *forever* (though it was delicious). Next time, the can!

  • Vicki370 2 Jan, 2009

    Kaarle....I believe Pelaya is using sweetened condensed milk to make the filling by boiling it 2 1/2 hours in the can; but she prefers the store bought Dulche de Leche. Regular milk is used to make the cookie.

  • kaarle 2 Jan, 2009

    Could you explain please about the sweetened condensed milk boiling for 2 1/2 hours? Is that for the filling or part of the cookie recipe? Do you use regular milk in the cookie recipe? I want to try these.

  • pelaya 2 Jan, 2009

    Alfajores is a provably the most popular cookie in Argentina, I have been including them in my Christmas list for more than 30 years, everybody loves them. My recipe is different than this one but the same idea. I use both the sweetened condensed milk and the bought dulce de leche, of course, I prefer the purchased one but the other works perfect also. I boil the can for a little over 2 1/2 hours because I want it to be a thick a possible so the cookies wont slide. Glad that so many enjoy these.

  • rsvoboda 2 Jan, 2009

    Has anyone used the Alfajores recipe from the cookie cookbook? I plan to make them later today and will update.

  • MKazaka 24 Dec, 2008

    These were a spectacular addition to my cookie swap recipes. I have never made alfajores before, but I have heard of the shortbread cookie version (with manjar blanco- instead of store-bought dulce de leche). These are very soft, fluffy, delicious, and dainty! I am making these again for Christmas tommorrow. BTW, it is absolutely important to use a cookie scoop or melon baller because the batter is much like cake batter. I don't think anyone is doing anything wrong; I think the batter is supposed to be fluffy and wet. Thats what gives these cookies their spongy texture as opposed to a solid shortbread type texture.

  • MKazaka 24 Dec, 2008

    These were a spectacular addition to my cookie swap recipes. I have never made alfajores before, but I have heard of the shortbread cookie version (with manjar blanco- instead of store-bought dulce de leche). These are very soft, fluffy, delicious, and dainty! I am making these again for Christmas tommorrow. BTW, it is absolutely important to use a cookie scoop or melon baller because the batter is much like cake batter. I don't think anyone is doing anything wrong; I think the batter is supposed to be fluffy and wet. Thats what gives these cookies their spongy texture as opposed to a solid shortbread type texture.

  • ddave 11 Oct, 2008

    I tried it again and it worked! So, JandJmommy, I think the wetness was from not scraping down the bowl and sides and paddle before/after pouring in the liquid, (and not putting all the liquid all at once) which allowed less flour to be trapped on the sides and paddle, thus alllowing more flour to be there for the liquid. That's really what I think happened the first time. But it still seemed like a wet dough, almost like a battter. But they baked up nicely, like little flat pillows!

  • ddave 11 Oct, 2008

    I tried it again and it worked! So, JandJmommy, I think the wetness was from not scraping down the bowl and sides and paddle before/after pouring in the liquid, (and not putting all the liquid all at once) which allowed less flour to be trapped on the sides and paddle, thus alllowing more flour to be there for the liquid. That's really what I think happened the first time. But it still seemed like a wet dough, almost like a battter. But they baked up nicely, like little flat pillows!

  • jlynnhamblin 1 Oct, 2008

    made this twice already. the dough itself was pleasing enough before baking. yummy. make sure all your ingredients are room temperature and use the smallest scoop to drop the dough in the sheet. made it with nutella, rasberry jam, and i eat it plain with green tea in the morning. yummy.

  • ddave 25 Sep, 2008

    Help! I love aflajores, but have never made them before. When I tried this recipe, I also had problems with it looking wetter,much like cake batter. I tried to fix it with more flour, but they ended up looking like little scones.

  • AlfajoresArgentina 24 Sep, 2008

    Hey! Great recipe...

    Find here a great site for alfajores too:

    http://www.alfajorargentino.com.ar

  • JandJmommy 22 Sep, 2008

    I made these this past weekend and they were at a great consistency until I added the wet ingredients. HELP! where did I go wrong. I'm a freak about measuring when i bake.... It was like dough before the wet ing. and like cake batter after.......Any thoughts. thanks

  • sustainable_kitchen 18 Sep, 2008

    perfect! i was looking for something to take to a barbeque this weekend.

  • newyorker132 18 Sep, 2008

    Anything of Matt's is fantastic!

  • bakerbern 17 Sep, 2008

    don't boil the sweetened condensed milk! Go to the eaglebrand.com website and learn how to carmelize it safeley.

  • LaSapa 17 Sep, 2008

    These are my husbands and my favorite Peruvian Dessert too!! Homemade Manjar Blanco is much better as a filling than the canned Dulce de Leche. The cutout recipe for these cookies is also easier to make than the drop cookie version. Makes more uniform cookies and they sit flatter on a serving plate! :)

  • LaSapa 17 Sep, 2008

    These are my husbands and my favorite Peruvian Dessert too!! Homemade Manjar Blanco is much better as a filling than the canned Dulce de Leche. The cutout recipe for these cookies is also easier to make than the drop cookie version. Makes more uniform cookies and they sit flatter on a serving plate! :)

  • am5913 17 Sep, 2008

    Does anyone know how long Sweetened Condensed Milk needs to be boiled to obtain the desired consistency for this recipe's filling? Thanks!

  • ContentedBliss47 17 Sep, 2008

    These look delicious! I'd like to try Nutella as a filling variation.

  • cutiepies 17 Sep, 2008

    My favorite yummy Peruvian dessert!