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Carrot-Pecan Cake

This cake was developed for our magazine's Passover desserts story. It is dusted with a mixture of granulated sugar and potato starch instead of confectioners' sugar, as confectioners' sugar contains cornstarch and is therefore not kosher for Passover.

  • servings: 8

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Ingredients

  • 5 medium carrots, peeled
  • 6 tablespoons margarine, melted, plus more for pan
  • Matzo meal, for pan
  • 1/3 cup plus 1/2 teaspoon potato starch
  • 1 cup finely ground pecans
  • 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 3 large whole eggs, separated
  • 1 large egg yolk
  • 1/2 cup packed light-brown sugar
  • Zest of 1 orange
  • 1/3 cup superfine sugar
  • 2/3 cup golden raisins
  • 2/3 cup chopped pecans, toasted
  • 3 tablespoons granulated sugar

Directions

  1. Step 1

    Cut 3 carrots into 1/2-inch-thick rounds. Place a steamer basket in a medium saucepan containing 1 inch of water. Bring water to a boil; add carrots. Steam until fork-tender, about 10 minutes. Transfer to a medium bowl, and mash with a fork to yield 1 cup; set aside. Grate the remaining 2 carrots to yield 1 cup, and set aside.

  2. Step 2

    Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease an 8-inch-round Bundt or angel-food cake pan with margarine, and dust with matzo meal. In a small bowl, whisk together 1/3 cup potato starch, ground pecans, cinnamon, and allspice; set aside.

  3. Step 3

    In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat all 4 egg yolks and brown sugar on medium-high speed until mixture holds a ribbonlike trail on the surface for 3 seconds when you raise the whisk. Add mashed carrots, orange zest, and margarine. Continue beating until mixture is light in color. Transfer to a large bowl. Wash and dry mixer bowl and attachment.

  4. Step 4

    Place egg whites in the mixer bowl, and beat on medium-high speed until soft peaks form. With the mixer running, slowly pour in the superfine sugar, and beat until stiff and glossy. Fold both the egg-white and potato-starch mixtures into the egg-yolk mixture. Fold in raisins, chopped pecans, and grated carrots. Pour batter into the prepared pan.

  5. Step 5

    Transfer pan to oven; bake until a cake tester inserted into the middle of the cake comes out clean, about 40 minutes. Transfer pan to a wire rack to cool, about 2 hours.

  6. Step 6

    To unmold the cake, hold the pan in a hot-water bath for 10 seconds, then invert the cake onto a serving platter. Place granulated sugar and remaining 1/2 teaspoon potato starch in the bowl of a food processor. Process 2 minutes. Before removing the lid of the bowl, let dust settle. Transfer mixture to a fine sieve, and dust cake.

Source
Martha Stewart Living, April 1998

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Reviews (6)

  • Eckssie 25 Mar, 2009

    I would you matzah meal instead of potato starch.

  • gs55 6 Apr, 2008

    There is confectioners sugar kosher for passover made without cornstarch.Two brands are Haddar and Mishpacha.

  • MicheleLee 4 Feb, 2008

    A small correction in the description alongside this recipe- Cornstarch is not one of the restricted foods on Passover. However Ashkenazi Jews (of German/Polish descent) have the custom not to eat corn as it falls under the category of kitnyot.

  • MicheleLee 4 Feb, 2008

    A small correction in the description alongside this recipe- Cornstarch is not one of the restricted foods on Passover. However Ashkenazi Jews (of German/Polish descent) have the custom not to eat corn as it falls under the category of kitnyot.

  • MicheleLee 4 Feb, 2008

    A small correction in the description alongside this recipe- Cornstarch is not one of the restricted foods on Passover. However Ashkenazi Jews (of German/Polish descent) have the custom not to eat corn as it falls under the category of kitnyot.

  • MicheleLee 4 Feb, 2008

    A small correction in the description alongside this recipe- Cornstarch is not one of the restricted foods on Passover. However Ashkenazi Jews (of German/Polish descent) have the custom not to eat corn as it falls under the category of kitnyot.