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Homemade Corned Beef with Vegetables

Here, the traditional Irish meal of corned beef and cabbage is supplemented with turnips, carrots, and boiled potatoes. Serve it with a loaf of freshly baked Irish soda bread. The brisket needs to brine for two weeks, so plan ahead. Martha made this recipe on Cooking School episode 305.

  • servings: 8

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Ingredients

For the Corned Beef

  • 2 quarts water
  • 1 cup coarse salt
  • 1 tablespoon pink curing salt
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon coriander seeds, crushed
  • 1 teaspoon mustard seeds, crushed
  • 1 teaspoon black peppercorns, crushed
  • 1 cinnamon stick, crushed
  • 4 dried bay leaves, crushed
  • 8 whole cloves
  • 5 pounds flat-cut beef brisket
  • 1 medium onion, halved
  • 1 medium celery stalk, halved
  • 1 medium carrot, peeled, halved
  • 1 pound baby turnips, peeled, trimmed
  • 1 pound baby carrots, peeled, trimmed
  • 1 medium head cabbage, cut into 8 wedges
  • 1 pound small red potatoes
  • Dijon mustard, for serving

Cook's Note

On "Cooking School", Martha added 12 sprigs of fresh flat-leaf parsley. If you would like to use parsley, simply add it in step five along with the cabbage and potatoes. Pink curing salt develops flavor. The brisket can be made without it, but the result won’t be as intense.

Directions

  1. Step 1

    Make the brine: Bring water to a boil in a large pot. Add salts, sugar, and spices; remove from heat, and stir until salts and sugar dissolve. Let cool.

  2. Step 2

    Make the corned beef: Place brisket in a nonreactive container just large enough to hold it. Pour cooled brine over meat. Place 2 small plates on top to keep meat submerged; cover, and refrigerate for 2 weeks.

  3. Step 3

    Rinse brisket; discard brine. Place in a large pot. Add enough water to cover by 2 inches. Add onion, celery, and halved carrot, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat, cover, and simmer until very tender, 3 to 3 1/2 hours.

  4. Step 4

    Set a steamer in a large saucepan. Add enough water to reach the bottom, and bring to a boil. Add turnips. Reduce heat, cover, and steam until tender, 8 to 10 minutes. Transfer to a bowl. Repeat with baby carrots, steaming 10 to 12 minutes. Add to turnips.

  5. Step 5

    Transfer corned beef to a cutting board. Tent with foil, and let rest for 30 minutes. Discard remaining solids from broth, then bring to a boil. Add cabbage and potatoes, and simmer until tender, about 25 minutes. Add turnips and carrots, and cook until warmed through. Transfer vegetables to a platter; reserve broth.

  6. Step 6

    Trim excess fat from beef. Slice thinly against grain, and transfer to platter. Serve with broth and mustard.

Source
The Martha Stewart Show, February Winter 2009

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Reviews (47)

  • 1 Dec, 2013

    I made extra of the spice mixture one year. The following Thanksgiving and New Year holiday season I found it and used it as a potpourri! Just a tablespoon in a saucepan of simmering water will fill your house with a wonderful scent. Of course, it was delicious in its original intended use! :)

  • 23 Jul, 2013

    Would you recommend any bulk spices to have in your kitchen? I tend to have most of the popular ingredients needed for most of these recipes but my food seasoning selection is not up to par and so I was wondering if you recommend any spices to always have on hand for some of the more common recipes?

  • 9 Jun, 2013

    Very good Recipe. One difference my grandmother did was to cook it in the oven at 225 for about an hour or more per pound. Be sure to cover the meat completely with water and put a lid on it. I'm not sure why, but it comes out much more tender than the crock pot.

    We always cook the veggies separately, using a few cups of the juice from the meat.

  • 18 Mar, 2011

    My supermarket was out of already brined corned beef, so I bought a brisket on St. Patricks day. Instead of waiting for a brine to "corn" my beef. I just stove top slow cooked (3 hours) my beef with the spices (no pink sugar) and a little bit of tomato paste (for tenderizing) and it was great!! Little different, but the texture and taste was pretty darn near close. And probably healthier. I added the vegetables in the last hour of cooking.

  • 14 Mar, 2011

    I always make corned beef in the slow cooker and it comes out great. Put the onions, carrots, celery, garlic etc in the crock first, then add the meat with the pickling spices. Add in one cup of water and cook according to the slow cookers instructions. I cut a head of cabbage and put in my cast iron pan with one cup of the liquid from the cooked corned beef. It steams nicely and gives so much flavor. Much better than boiling the cabbage which I find tasteless.

  • 13 Mar, 2011

    Can this be done in the slow cooker?

  • 21 Feb, 2011

    I just found this recipe from the Great American Spice web-site. I have been looking for a homemade corned beef recipe for years, ever since grocery stores started selling it with all the spices in a little plastic pack and not on the meat. This is like my grandmother made it when I was a child. Thank you so much for posting the recipe.

  • 3 Feb, 2011

    I found the prague powder at www.americanspice.com thanks for the other comments

  • 22 Mar, 2010

    This is the second year in a row that I have made this recipe and it never fails to impress or be great! People whom I have served this to have said it is one of the best corned beef they have eaten! And I must agree. It is simple to make and it turns out delicious! One word of advice, braise it for 3.5 hours not just the 3 hours. It always turns out best that way.

  • 16 Mar, 2010

    In New England, "corned beef" is typically gray in color, where New York style "corned beef" is bright red. New Englanders do not use saltpeter (or saltpetre). The seasonings otherwise remain largely the same, with individual recipes varying amounts of particular spices. Great simple recipe, Martha, thank you for the suggestion!

  • 3 Mar, 2010

    I love Martha but she doesn't have enough vegetarian recipes! what are vegetarians suppose to eat for st.patrick's day, soda bread? oh well, green (tea) muffins for all! http://www.fourgreensteps.com/community/recipes/desserts-a-goodies-/meri...

  • 25 Feb, 2010

    Pink curing salt is a combination of salt and sodium nitrate. They dye it pink so it does not get used accidentally. You can get chemical poisoning from to much nitrite in food. The nitrites are used primarily to inhibit bacterial growth and also to preserve the pink color of aged/cured meats. If you can't find pink curing salt you can buy pure sodium nitrite (saltpeter) from a pharmacy. It must be added to regular salt at 5% of the total weight of the salt in the recipe.

  • 19 Mar, 2009

    Great recipe that is easy and yields a tasty corned beef brisket. I brined for only 9 days and the flavor was still very good. You don't need the pink curing salt. It's just there to keep the meat color pink. I would just omit it. You'll still get the same great flavor.

  • 19 Mar, 2009

    In a word this is Great!!! I made this for St. Patricks Day. I'd never Corn Beef before. As many others I found it difficult to find the curing salt. The local butcher I purchased the brisket from gave me enough for the recipe. I only had 10 days to brine the meat and it was good. This by far is the best Corn beef I've ever had. I talked with other who had made it before and they warned me NOT to boil the meat it would be tough. Make sure its a Slow simmer.

  • 17 Mar, 2009

    I made this http://marthaandme.wordpress.com/2009/03/17/st-pattys-day-blowout/ - I used Morton curing salt instead

  • 16 Mar, 2009

    i tried the corn beef but first of all there is no pink curing salt. whole foods never heard of it. so i used himalyan pink sea salt that was all whole foods had. and it said to use a little more. i did everything else the pickling spices and salt and sugar. i cooked it last nite. it was the worse corn beef i ever had it was way to salty and tough. but i will continue to watch you everyday. thanks cindy

  • 16 Mar, 2009

    Note to Mamalaid: Pink curing salt contains Sodium Nitrite, Glycerin, and FD

  • 16 Mar, 2009

    I'm so glad to find this recipe as corned beef is my favourite meal. As i'm trying to avoid nitrates and other nasty additives and neurotoxins for my children's health, I was delighted to see Martha make a completely healthy and controllable option. thankyou. mamalaid

  • 15 Mar, 2009

    If you don't have 2 weeks to brine a corned beef there are other brining recipes that call for less time, for example Darina Allen's recipe. She runs the Ballymaloe Cooking School in Ballymaloe, Ireland.

  • 15 Mar, 2009

    If you don't have 2 weeks to brine a corned beef there are other brining recipes that call for less time, for example Darina Allen's recipe. She runs the Ballymaloe Cooking School in Ballymaloe, Ireland.

  • 14 Mar, 2009

    If you don't have 2 weeks to brine a corned beef there are other brining recipes that call for less time, for example Darina Allen's recipe. She runs the Ballymaloe Cooking School in Ballymaloe, Ireland.

  • 13 Mar, 2009

    This recipe is for the homemade version of corned beef. In other words, you are starting completely from scratch with a beef brisket which you are "curing" for 2 weeks. I am happy to find this recipe as my son-in-law wanted to try doing this. However, if you do not have two weeks, and who does in this busy world, just buy a "corned" beef brisket at any market and then cook for a few hours, as shown in this recipe, or with the recipe on the package. I usually cook the vegetables in the water.

  • 12 Mar, 2009

    What happnes if you do not have the full two weeks to brine the meat? Is it just less salty?

  • 12 Mar, 2009

    What happnes if you do not have the full two weeks to brine the meat? Is it just less salty?

  • 12 Mar, 2009

    What happnes if you do not have the full two weeks to brine the meat? Is it just less salty?

  • 12 Mar, 2009

    What happnes if you do not have the full two weeks to brine the meat? Is it just less salty?

  • 12 Mar, 2009

    What happnes if you do not have the full two weeks to brine the meat? Is it just less salty?

  • 12 Mar, 2009

    What happnes if you do not have the full two weeks to brine the meat? Is it just less salty?

  • 11 Mar, 2009

    To lechat98. I believe pink salt in nothing more than sodium nitrate which is used in brines to turn the meat pink when cooked. It's used in ham, bacon etc. Your local butcher may have some. It's available from a company by the name of "The sausage factory" under the name of prague powder. Use no more than 3 grams for 1 kilo of meat.

  • 10 Mar, 2009

    Why not cook all the vegetables in with the corned beef?

  • 7 Mar, 2009

    I just found the recipe today and have started the brining process with only 10 days till St Pat's. Will 10 days be long enough for a properly corned beef?

  • 4 Mar, 2009

    By the way, Cook's Illustrated has a recipe that does not include the pink salt. I think you can just omit it. It is still delicious.

  • 4 Mar, 2009

    I bought my pink salt from a local meat/sausage maker. Any place that makes their own bacon, sausage, etc. should be able to sell you a little. It is also called Prague Powder #1.

  • 2 Mar, 2009

    Help! I can not find pink curing salt anywhere. What can I substitute? I was able to find everything else and now have a beautiful brisket sitting in my fridge waiting.

  • 2 Mar, 2009

    Just another comment...I found another recipe at cooks.com for corned beef http://www.cooks.com/rec/view/0,1927,147178-243206,00.html and it says to refrigerate for 2 weeks. It does not have curing salt in it. This is too frustrating so I am going to just eliminate the pink curing salt and hope for the best!

  • 2 Mar, 2009

    I was just reading about a product called Morton Tender Quick. Supposedly, this can easily be found in grocery stores and is used in curing meats. I have been trying, with no luck, to find pink curing salt. So, I was wondering if anyone has heard of this or tried it? Thx.

  • 28 Feb, 2009

    I would be very wary of using something that is not labeled as curing salt. Curing salt has additives which will help preserve the meat (remember, it is sitting for two weeks).
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curing_salt
    http://www.gourmetsleuth.com/equivalents_substitutions.asp?index=C

  • 28 Feb, 2009

    After searching I found that pink curing salt, (sodium nitrite other ingredients), and Himalayan pink salt (only NaCl), are different and have different effects on the meat. I would be interested to know which was intended to be used in this recipe. Pink curing salt is widely used for curing meats, fish, poultry, game and many other products, as a safety measure. Can someone help?

  • 27 Feb, 2009

    Found the pink salt in small plastic packets at COST PLUS. iT IS NOT CALLED BRINING SALT BUT CAN BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. iT'S CALLED Himalayan Pink Salt - 3ozs for $1.99. It is also sold at Whole Foods under the same name but you have to buy more. So this amout will be more than enough for the Corned Beef for St. Patricks Day.

  • 27 Feb, 2009

    Can you make this recipe without the pink salt, which I could not find at the store?

  • 27 Feb, 2009

    Try Whole Foods which usually carries unusual items that you would not normally find in your market.

  • 27 Feb, 2009

    Try Whole Foods which usually carries unusual items that you would not normally find in your market.

  • 27 Feb, 2009

    Can you make this recipe without the pink salt, which I could not find at the store?

  • 27 Feb, 2009

    Can you make this recipe without the pink salt, which I could not find at the store?

  • 26 Feb, 2009

    Try this linke for pink salt.

    http://www.stuffers.com/

  • 26 Feb, 2009

    I make corned beef about once a year from a very old recipe. Looking forward to trying a different one. I plan to use just plain Kosher salt since I am sure there will be no pink salt around here.

  • 26 Feb, 2009

    Where do you buy pink curing salt. I live in upstate NY and ingredients can be hard to find! (We do have Wegman's, however!)