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Oatmeal-Almond Crisps

  • prep: 25 mins
    total time: 1 hour
  • yield: Makes 20

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup packed light-brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, melted
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 1/2 cups rolled oats, (not quick-cooking)
  • 1/2 cup sliced almonds
  • Nonstick cooking spray

Directions

  1. Step 1

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.

  2. Step 2

    In a large bowl, whisk brown sugar, butter, egg, and vanilla until smooth. Mix in oats and almonds.

  3. Step 3

    Drop mixture by level tablespoons onto prepared baking sheets, spacing about 2 inches apart. Spray the underside of a metal spatula with nonstick cooking spray, and use to flatten cookies into 2 1/2-inch disks.

  4. Step 4

    Bake until golden, 14 to 16 minutes. Cool completely on baking sheets. (Handle with care; cookies are fragile.)

Source
Everyday Food, January/February 2006

Reviews (25)

  • 20 Aug, 2008

    These are very tasty and healthy!

  • 8 Aug, 2008

    Cookies fell apart so I used it as granola.

  • 25 Jul, 2008

    i used 2 eggs instead of one, and the cookies are very firm and does not fall apart at all, even though the dough was very loose and crumbly. these cookies were ok, not one of my favourites

  • 23 Jul, 2008

    Mmmmm, these cookies are too good to be true. Great!

  • 17 Jul, 2008

    I think you're right, turtlegrins, getting them a little darker on the bottom helps them stay together. I did two pans with silpats, the lower pan turned out darker, tastier, and stayed together better than the top pan. Served with a small dish of vanilla ice cream and they were a big hit!

  • 16 Jul, 2008

    Ohhhh my goodness! These are my new favorite! I tried both the even TBSP and the heaping TBSP and both worked just fine (ie, didn't fall apart). I got them a little darker on the bottom than I anticipated, but they didn't taste burnt at all... maybe that's what held them together better? Also... perhaps the parchment paper worked better than the silpat for some of you? I don't know if it makes a difference. Gluten-free yumminess!!!

  • 16 Jul, 2008

    This was the first "cookie of the day" I've made. I brought it to a team (tennis) luncheon and it was a big hit. Everyone loved it and I passed out the recipe to several of my teammates. I used a little more than 1 Tablespoon and they were not fragile at all.

    Tish

  • 15 Jul, 2008

    Try pressing the entire mixture into a square baking sheet/pan with your hands and bake it that way, like a giant cookie bar. Make sure to not flatten it out so much if you do make the cookies. That's what makes it so fragile!

  • 15 Jul, 2008

    I found this recipe on the website years ago, and I've been making it ever since. I think it's so delicious. It's a cookie that has great taste, but doesnt make you do into a sugar coma.

  • 15 Jul, 2008

    cont...
    and got same results. Ended up using them as granola! Yummy!

  • 15 Jul, 2008

    Made these last year. While they tasted great, most of mine fell apart when taking them off the silpat...waited for 5 mins, waited til cool, took off immediately

  • 15 Jul, 2008

    these recipies are great but i cannot use eggs or wheat...so what do i have to use instead of eggs???

  • 15 Jul, 2008

    It's simple to figure out nutritional data for any recipe. Just use the nutritional data for each individual ingredient (found on the container or visit the USDA nutrient database at http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/), add it all up and then divide by number of servings. For instance, I calculated that each of these cookies has approximately 77 calories. If I cared, I could have calculated sodium or carbohydrate content as well. The arithmetic involved is pretty basic.

  • 15 Jul, 2008

    Actually, if you use splenda instead of the brown sugar the cookies would be sooo crispy they would break apart just by looking at them... haha although you can go half of brown sugar and half splenda and work great..

  • 15 Jul, 2008

    Actually, if you use splenda instead of the brown sugar the cookies would be sooo crispy they would break apart just by looking at them... haha although you can go half of brown sugar and half splenda and work great..

  • 15 Jul, 2008

    I too am wondering about using Splenda in place of all or part of the sugar.

  • 15 Jul, 2008

    I haven't made them yet (today though) but they seem to need something else, maybe a tiny drop of almond extract? If you need nutritional info you should try recipes of "Cooking Light" they always have nutritional info. 1/3 cup sugar dvided by 20 should give you a start.

  • 15 Jul, 2008

    No, the object is to make the cookies very thin. Thus the sliced almonds.

  • 15 Jul, 2008

    I always used slivered almonds whenever a recipe calls for any kind of almonds.

  • 15 Jul, 2008

    This seems like it would be a VERY healthy cookie/crisp... Would substituting Splenda for all or half of the sugar work since this has very few ingredients?

  • 15 Jul, 2008

    I think the sliced almonds might have a little better taste when toasted but I would give the the slivered almonds (toasted) as try as well as toasted chopped pecans or chopped walnuts. I think the disappearing rate will be about the same. I'd even add chocolated chips, butterscotch chips, or both!! Somebody preheat the oven!!! Yum!!!

  • 15 Jul, 2008

    I too would be interested in the nutritional information. My children are diabetic and I'm a weight watcher. kmesew

  • 15 Jul, 2008

    My previous comment did not fully print. As a diabetic I would appreciate the nutritional information on these cookies. It would influence wether I baked them or not, and how many I could eat.

  • 15 Jul, 2008

    As a diabetic

  • 15 Jul, 2008

    Do you think slivered almonds would work as well?