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Under 30 Minutes

Under 30 Minutes

Herbed Spaetzle

These bite-size dumplings are called spaetzle and originated in Germany.

  • prep: 10 mins
    total time: 15 mins
  • servings: 4
Photography: John Kernick

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Ingredients

  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 8 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 1 tablespoon thyme leaves
  • 1/4 cup packed fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter

Directions

  1. Step 1

    Bring milk and 4 thyme sprigs to a boil in a small saucepan. Remove from heat. Discard thyme. Transfer milk to a blender; add parsley, thyme leaves, and eggs. Blend until combined.

  2. Step 2

    Whisk flour and 1 1/2 teaspoons salt in a medium bowl. Gradually whisk in milk mixture until smooth.

  3. Step 3

    Bring a medium saucepan of salted water to a boil. Working with about 1/4 cup batter at a time, press batter through 1/4-inch holes of a colander or spaetzle maker into boiling water. Cook until spaetzle float to top, 1 to 2 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer to an ice-water bath. Drain.

  4. Step 4

    Melt butter in a medium nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add half of the spaetzle; cook, stirring occasionally, until golden, about 6 minutes. Transfer to a bowl. Repeat. Season with salt and pepper. Garnish with remaining thyme.

Source
Martha Stewart Living, October Fall 2006

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Reviews (2)

  • bb_sunshine 4 Feb, 2014

    I'm born in the SW part of Germany, where Spätzle come from.
    Three hints:
    a) I'd never, ever use milk, so steep the thyme in water. The basic recipe uses only flour, salt, egg and a bit of cold water.
    b) You can push the batter trough a potato ricer, this makes longish noodles ("Spätzle") and is a lot quicker. The method described here yields "Knöpfle" ("buttons")
    c) Always beat the batter a bit, it should become somewhat "stretchy" or elastic. A wooden spoon is best.
    Enjoy!

  • klspotts 6 Nov, 2007

    This was a little difficult and messy to make but very delicious. My kids (ages two and four) loved it. Instead of a colander or spaetzle maker, I've heard you can also put the batter in a bag and snip off the corner and drop the batter in the water that way. Have not tried it though.