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Creamy Fudge Hearts

When making fudge, follow the instructions to the letter and make sure your candy thermometer works correctly. To check it, put it in a pan of boiling water; it should read exactly 212 degrees. Timing can vary greatly in candy making, depending on the weather and your equipment, so follow your candy thermometer readings, using the times given in the recipe guidelines.

  • yield: Makes about 4 dozen 1-inch hearts

Ingredients

  • Canola oil for the pan and cutters
  • 1 1/4 cups milk
  • 3 1/2 cups sugar
  • 8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, cut in small pieces
  • Pink gel food coloring, (optional)

Directions

  1. Step 1

    Lightly oil a 9-inch-square pan. (A smaller pan will make the fudge thicker and more difficult to cut.) Place milk in a heavy 12-quart saucepan. Stir in sugar; add butter. Over medium heat, stir constantly, until sugar dissolves and butter melts. Increase heat to medium high, bring to a boil, and cover with lid. Let boil for 2 minutes, and uncover. Do not stir; clip a candy thermometer on side of pan, and let mixture boil, over medium-low heat, until it reaches 240 degrees (the soft-ball stage), 15 to 25 minutes. Meanwhile, prepare an ice water bath.

  2. Step 2

    Immediately remove pan from heat, and dip the base of the pan in the ice water for 5 seconds. Let the fudge sit at room temperature without stirring, with the thermometer attached, until the thermometer reads 122 degrees and mixture is lukewarm, about 40 minutes. If using food coloring, add 1 drop. Stir the fudge with a wooden spoon until it changes from glossy to opaque and is thick and creamy, 2 to 5 minutes. Quickly pour into prepared pan. Use piece of plastic wrap to smooth fudge into the pan, creating an even surface. Let cool completely, 2 to 3 hours, and cut with 1/2- to 1 1/2-inch heart cookie cutters. (Oil the cutters with the canola oil inside and out before using.) Fudge will keep, well wrapped in plastic or in an airtight container, up to 1 week.

Source
Martha Stewart Living, February 2000

Reviews (33)

  • 27 Jan, 2011

    This may be a dumb question or it may not....but does it really mean 12 quart sauce pan? What average household has a 12 quart sauce pan. Would this be becuase it bubbles up so much like when I make Almond Roca? I really want to give this recipe a whirl...thinking about making homemade vanilla sugar and then add the little seeds...YUM!!

  • 13 Feb, 2009

    I altered the recipe and still had great results. After reading the recipe I realized the only flavor would be a "carmel" sort of flavor so I added ~1/4C of strawberry syrup (from a package of frozen strawberries with added sugar to make the syrup) and put a little less sugar. I added this syrup to the milk (I used heavy cream). I added very small pieces of chopped strawberry where the recipe called for food coloring. Strawberry n cream fudge came out great without the artificial coloring.

  • 13 Feb, 2009

    I altered the recipe and still had great results. After reading the recipe I realized the only flavor would be a "carmel" sort of flavor so I added ~1/4C of strawberry syrup (from a package of frozen strawberries with added sugar to make the syrup) and put a little less sugar. I added this syrup to the milk (I used heavy cream). I added very small pieces of chopped strawberry where the recipe called for food coloring. Strawberry n cream fudge came out great without the artificial coloring.

  • 13 Feb, 2009

    isseisagawa- I am not a baker. I saw this recipe and thought it looked easy. While making it, i read your comment, and it freak me out! I was thinking if people who CAN bake cant do this, then im screwed! But for some odd miracle, mine turned out! I used fat free milk and Darigold sweet cream butter. I also went by some of the times but stuck to what my thermometer said. Hope any of this helps!

  • 11 Feb, 2009

    I attempted to make this last night and failed miserably... I too had reservations about the pan size as well as the absence of chocolate but they are so cute that I decided to try. Everything went smoothly until I reached the stage where I was to "pour" (if you can call it that - more like push) the fudge into prepared pan. When the fudge became opaque I began to "pour" it into said pan and it just solidified right before my eyes. With further scrutiny, I noticed that it was powder like. Can anyone te

  • 11 Feb, 2009

    I attempted to make this last night and failed miserably. I too had reservations about the pan size as well as the absence of chocolate. Everything went smoothly until the point at which I was to pour the fudge into the oiled pan... The mixture became opaque so I attempted to "pour" (if you can even call it that - more like push) the fudge into said pan and suddenly it solidified (when I touched it with the spoon it turned into a powder)! Can anyone tell me what went wrong? Any info would be appreciated

  • 10 Feb, 2009

    1. It seems to me that a "12 quart" pan is an error too.
    2. Is this a "vanilla" fudge?
    3. What type of milk -- whole, 2% or 1/2% -- will work?
    I hope someone frmo the MS staff can answer these. Thanks!

  • 7 Feb, 2009

    Thanks for the info.

  • 7 Feb, 2009

    Ms Sugarbaker...if you want to do a different flavour you should find a recipe specific to that flavour rather than adding ingredients to this recipe. Fudge is easy enough to make but does require accuracy in measurements and temperatures. However add ins like nuts, coconut or craisins wouldn't affect the texture of the recipe.

  • 7 Feb, 2009

    I can't believe that noone questioned the size of the sauce pan.
    Surely you wouldn't need a pan that was more than 2 quarts!!
    12 quarts equals 48 cups for goodness sakes. Obviously
    they had a typo and meant 2 quarts. Also fudge is a type
    of candy not the flavor though many of us like chocolate fudge
    for one flavor.

  • 7 Feb, 2009

    It is obvious that a lot of those who made comments on this recipe have never made fudge of any kind. Just get out your recipe books and look up the candy section and find fudge and make it. I don't see why you couldn't make the hearts from any kind of fudge. I would not recommend putting anything but unsweetened chocolate in this one and personally would advise finding a recipe for chocolate fudge for best results. I have been making fudge since I was a child and am now in my 70's and learned from my mother who was known for her fudge and other candies. To the ones who remarked how sweet it is, that is fudge. I have never had one that is not very sweet. : )

  • 7 Feb, 2009

    I like the smiplicity of this recipe. If I want to make peanut butter fudge or chocolate fudge, does anyone know how much peanut butter I should add? Also, for chocolate fudge...what kind of chocolate and how much should I add. Thanks so much!

  • 7 Feb, 2009

    Actually, fudge is a type of candy and not a flavor. Fudge can be peanut-butter, vanilla, butterscotch, etc. We just usually hear most about chocolate fudge.

  • 7 Feb, 2009

    FUDGE? Where is th chocolate?

  • 7 Feb, 2009

    depending on the type of chocolate you choose you may need to adjust the amount of butter and sugar- if you use a 70% dark you are probably ok as it has little of both- but a milk chocolate or semi-sweet chocolate will contain more sugar and more cocoa butter, so you may need to decrease the amount of butter and or sugar in the recipe by a littel bit- a tablespoon or so for every 4-6 ounces of chocolate. good luck!

  • 7 Feb, 2009

    AShill, I would just add melted semi-sweet baking chocolate, say Ghirardelli to the milk mixture, when you're adding in the butter and sugar. You may want to check other fudge recipes though.

  • 7 Feb, 2009

    how can you make these chocolate fudge hearts?

  • 7 Feb, 2009

    how can you make these chocolate fudge hearts?

  • 7 Feb, 2009

    I'm not as excited about the recipe as I am the box! The papers and scalloped edge on the packaging is adorable!

  • 4 Feb, 2009

    I guess you have to measure butter using a spoon or a cup,1 stick is also equivalent to 1/2 cup of butter.hope that can make it easier for you to measure

  • 26 Jan, 2009

    Chimbis- Thank you- you saved my day! ,-)

  • 22 Jan, 2009

    113grm

  • 21 Jan, 2009

    Hi! Could everyone tell me, how gram (g) 1 stick of butter is? Thank you!

  • 21 Jan, 2009

    Hi! Could everyone tell me, how gram (g) 1 stick of butter is? Thank you!

  • 20 Jan, 2009

    You won't know if the recipe is gross or not if you don't try it. I thought I would hate a recipe for cookies because it has nuts in it and I don't like nuts but now it is one of my favorite cookies.

  • 7 Jan, 2009

    i agree with cambell cw lol

  • 5 Jan, 2009

    I think you should at least try the recipe before you decide that it's "gross".

    I make a buttercrunch toffee that contains essentially 2 ingredients: butter and sugar. Not that much different from this fudge. It's my most requested food from my family and friends. They even hoard the toffee from each other. It's gotten so bad, I've renamed it "Crack".

  • 17 Oct, 2008

    well that's gotta be gross....just milk sugar and butter....yuck! They look cute though.

  • 25 Sep, 2008

    If I wanted to use a different fudge recipe, would the heart shapes still hold and look cute and presentable?

  • 23 Jul, 2008

    so if they wee two sweet do you think 3 cups of sugar will be enough?will it bw better onlywith 3 cups?

  • 22 Jan, 2008

    I made these last year and I have to say they were a huge disappointment. They were so sweet that they were inedible. And I like sweet!

  • 2 Jan, 2008

    I will try these for Valentine Day 2008 and also make heart shaped marshmallows, using the Snowflake Marshmallow recipe.

  • 11 Dec, 2007

    I think I will make it in next Valantine to my lovely husbend