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Strawberry Jam

117

Use slightly underripe strawberries for best results. To extend the jam's shelf life, process in canning jars according to manufacturer's instructions.

  • Yield: Makes 48 ounces

Source: Martha Stewart Living, June 2003

Ingredients

  • 4 pounds strawberries, rinsed, hulled, and cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 5 cups granulated sugar (2 1/4 pounds)

Directions

  1. Put a small plate in the freezer. Place berries in a nonreactive 10-quart stockpot set over medium-high heat. Using a wooden spoon, mix in 1/4 cup sugar with berries. Cook, stirring, until berries are juicy, 5 to 6 minutes. Stir in a third of remaining sugar until dissolved. Repeat until all the sugar has been added and dissolved, about 7 minutes total.

  2. Bring mixture to a full boil; cook, stirring, 10 minutes. Continue boiling; use a stainless-steel spoon to remove foam from surface. Boil until most of the liquid is absorbed, mixture thickens, and temperature registers 220 degrees on a candy thermometer, about 30 minutes.

  3. Perform a gel test: Place a spoonful of jam on chilled plate, and return to freezer. Wait 1 to 2 minutes; remove plate from freezer, and gently press jam with fingertip; it should wrinkle slightly.

  4. After jam passes the gel test, remove from heat. Pour warm jam into jars; seal, label, and refrigerate up to 4 months.

Reviews Add a comment

  • shellygloo
    7 SEP, 2012
    I love to make jams without pectin, but yes they take a longer cooking time. They also take considerably less sugar than when you use pectin. The cooking time depends upon how much natural pectin is in the fruit. Strawberries have less pectin than other fruits, especially when very ripe. The first batch I made turned out perfectly, using the "plate" test, although the jam is darker in color than when making pectin jam. Delicious!
    Reply
  • shellygloo
    7 SEP, 2012
    I love to make jams without pectin, but yes they take a longer cooking time. They also take considerably less sugar than when you use pectin. The cooking time depends upon how much natural pectin is in the fruit. Strawberries have less pectin than other fruits, especially when very ripe. The first batch I made turned out perfectly, using the "plate" test, although the jam is darker in color than when making pectin jam. Delicious!
    Reply
  • tcdaycarekids@gmail.com
    3 SEP, 2012
    Amazing flavor, and my whole house smelled wonderfully of strawberries as they cooked down. The finished jam looks dark, rich, thick and beautiful, not too sweet.
    Reply
  • kitchengadget
    15 JUL, 2012
    Best strawberry recipe I have used! Taste is wonderful and it is an easy recipe to follow. Well worth the time and effort!
    Reply
  • baanos
    18 FEB, 2011
    Final product was tasty and great. However, I have had an issue in the process of making it: WARNING: I don't know if that happened to anyone else yet, but near the end of the full-boiling process when the liquid starts to thicken it may splash(happened to me at least) and make some mess in the kitchen and that thing is boiling hot obviously and not pleasant to get hit by. I guess I shouldn't have put the heat to MAX
    Reply
  • baanos
    18 FEB, 2011
    Final product was tasty and great. However, I have had an issue in the process of making it: WARNING: I don't know if that happened to anyone else yet, but near the end of the full-boiling process when the liquid starts to thicken it may splash(happened to me at least) and make some mess in the kitchen and that thing is boiling hot obviously and not pleasant to get hit by. I guess I shouldn't have put the heat to MAX
    Reply
  • megnard
    13 APR, 2010
    I made this jam last night and it turned out really well
    Reply
  • lechat98
    6 JUL, 2009
    Never mind! I just re-read the top portion and it says you can process it!
    Reply
  • lechat98
    6 JUL, 2009
    Does anyone know how to make this "shelf proof"? I don't want to have to store all of this in my refrigerator. Is it possible to just do a water bath?
    Reply
  • krisx2
    5 OCT, 2008
    Don't do what I did, and that is scorch the jam trying to get it to 220 degrees. I think there was something wrong with my thermometer (make sure you use a good one). Anyways, I wouldn't turn the heat up over medium - just to stay safe. I'll try again with another batch of fruit once I get over my broken heart.
    Reply