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  1. Sewing Repair Kit in a Binder

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    Where's an extra button when you need one? Find sewing supplies fast in this three-ring-binder repair kit. Add zipper pouches and a felt needle holder (use spray starch to make felt sturdier). 

    Mini three-ring binder, $16, russellandhazel.com. Zipper pouches, $3 each, containerstore.com (punch new holes as needed to fit binder).

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2011
    More Bright Ideas
  2. Sized to Fit

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    These oak-veneer cubbies are the ideal dimensions (about 10 inches square and 14 inches deep) for holding folded sweaters and pressed shirts. Painted and labeled wooden boxes are used inside the cubbies to corral garment- and shoe-care items and toiletries.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
  3. Hiding Supplies

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    Keep laundry supplies tidy and out of sight with built-in shelves and a curtain that can be pulled across them when the laundry is done. Mothballs and cedar chips are stored in canning jars, and little bars of soap are kept in airtight containers. Towels for drying hand-washables are stacked on one shelf. Special stain remedies are kept together in a galvanized metal box; detergent is in a large plastic container with a scoop for easy measuring.

    Source
    Organizing Good Things 2004
  4. Rock-Lined Flower Bed

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    Window boxes filled with vibrant flowers are a welcome sign of spring. But when it rains, the soil in them often spatters, dirtying windows and sills. To prevent the muddy splashes, spread river stones (available at garden centers) in a layer over the tops of the flower beds. The stones will act as a barrier while keeping the soil moist for the blooming plants.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, April 2008
  5. Towel Tune-Up

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    Are your towels holding less water than they used to? It may be that your choice of washing detergent contains fabric softener, which has residues that cling to individual fibers, rendering towels less absorbent. The next time you clean a load, add a cup of distilled white vinegar to the rinse cycle; it will remove the residue and restore towels' soaking power. In the future, avoid detergents with fabric softener when washing towels.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, July 2006
  6. Orchids: Out of the Vase, into the Strainer

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    Gutter strainers -- the wire cages that filter leaves and debris washed off the roof -- also make great orchid pots, providing the plants with excellent aeration and drainage. 

    Buy an inexpensive copper strainer at a hardware store. Using a pair of light pliers, bend the spindly legs of the strainer into decorative loops around the top (the loops also offer a way to hang the orchid if you like). Soak sphagnum moss (available at garden centers) in water, pack into the strainer, and then put in the orchid. Pack with more moss for a snug fit, and give it a hearty watering in the sink. Let the moss drain completely before placing the plant in a bowl.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, November 2008
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