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Almond-Coconut Tart

  • servings: 8

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Ingredients

FOR THE CRUST

  • Vegetable-oil cooking spray
  • 2 cups unsweetened shredded coconut
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 large egg whites
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

FOR THE FILLING

  • 1/2 vanilla bean, halved lengthwise
  • 1/2 cup vanilla soy milk
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • 2 teaspoons arrowroot or cornstarch
  • 2 tablespoons almond paste
  • 1 cup almond flour
  • 1/2 cup soy cream cheese, preferably Tofutti
  • 5 tablespoons apricot jam
  • 4 cups assorted berries

Directions

  1. Step 1

    Make the crust: Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Coat a 9-inch fluted tart pan with cooking spray. Combine remaining ingredients. Press into bottom and up sides of pan.

  2. Step 2

    Make the filling: Scrape vanilla seeds into a small saucepan, and add pod. Stir in soy milk and 2 tablespoons sugar, and bring to a boil. Whisk yolks, arrowroot or cornstarch, and remaining 2 tablespoons sugar in a bowl. Add hot soy milk in a slow, steady stream, whisking until combined. Return to pan, and whisk over medium heat until thickened, about 2 minutes. Discard vanilla pod.

  3. Step 3

    Beat milk mixture and almond paste with a mixer on medium speed for 5 minutes. Beat in almond flour and cream cheese. Spread into tart crust. Bake for 15 minutes. Cover edges with parchment, then foil. Bake until set, 15 to 25 minutes more. Let cool completely in pan on a rack. Unmold. Spread jam evenly over the tart. Arrange berries on top.

Source
Martha Stewart Living, April 2008

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Reviews (15)

  • 1 Sep, 2012

    Yes it is suitable for celiac. I have the illness and both gluten and lactose intolerance. This recipe (and many passover recipes that does not use matzo).
    I made them several times and all my friends (taht are not celiac loved this as well.

  • 20 May, 2011

    I am celiac (both Gluten and Lactose intolerance), and this recipe is perfect for me. MSL should tag this recipe as Gluten Free and Lactose Free recipe.

  • 20 May, 2011

    I tried this recipe a few time for a family gathering, and every one likes it. My BF's mom, even asked for the recipe, even if she really does not like Ms MS (ohhh she hold grudge from the time when Ms MS was still running a catering business in CT.

  • 14 Jul, 2010

    Would this be suitable for someone with Coeliac- Gluten allergy?

  • 6 Jun, 2010

    Could I use Vanilla hemp milk?

  • 2 Apr, 2009

    If you follow Ashkenazi custom, you'd need to use to use non-soy products, such as real dairy, in order for the recipe to be kosher for Passover. Soy is kitniyot, and therefore not considered kosher for Passover by Ashkenaz. The recipe looks delicious, though, and since I prefer dairy to meat, I think I'll just make it dairy. Martha Stewart has truly fabulous Jewish dessert recipes - thanks!

  • 14 Jun, 2008

    How should I adjust this recipe if I am using sweeteened coconut, regular milk, and regular cream cheese?

  • 23 Apr, 2008

    I made this with strawberries and they were dilicious. I halved recipe and made 2 individual tarte. They were absolutely delicious. Thank you so much for sharing!

  • 19 Apr, 2008

    I made this today for a seder this evening, and it was a total hit. It looked beautiful (the crust came out of the tart pan unharmed) and tasted great. Thanks so much for featuring this recipe!

  • 19 Apr, 2008

    The only reason that this is dairy free is because people likely will have eaten meat with their dinner. If you are not concerned about mixing meat and dairy, you could probably use regular cream cheese. Also, vanilla extract could probably be used in lieu of the vanilla bean. I am making this recipe (using Tofutti and a vanilla bean) today for a seder tonight. I hope it works for me! (my biggest concern is getting it out of the pan) BTW, almond flour is quite expensive!

  • 19 Apr, 2008

    The only reason that this is dairy free is because people likely will have eaten meat with their dinner. If you are not concerned about mixing meat and dairy, you could probably use regular cream cheese. Also, vanilla extract could probably be used in lieu of the vanilla bean. I am making this recipe (using Tofutti and a vanilla bean) today for a seder tonight. I hope it works for me! (my biggest concern is getting it out of the pan) BTW, almond flour is quite expensive!

  • 18 Apr, 2008

    the recipe looks great but I live on a farm in Montana and don't know where to get vanilla bean of tofutti soy cream cheese. what are some substitutes.

  • 13 Apr, 2008

    Experiment with the measurements, but you can substitute potato starch for the corn startch. I use potato starch all year as I have it left over. You usually need less potato starch than corn starch as a thickener.

  • 12 Apr, 2008

    I was so excited to try this for my seder (where we'll be serving meat) - the picture looks beautiful. I was sad to see the recipe called for soy. I guess I'll keep looking.

  • 3 Apr, 2008

    This recipe looks like it can be made for Passover if you substitute potato starch for the arrowroot and use real milk and cream cheese instead of soy. You might need to increase the vanilla a bit since you are not using the vanilla soy milk. While you would not be able to serve this for a seder where meat is served, there are lots of dairy meals during the Passover festival. The recipe looks so delicious, it might be worth playing with the recipe to make it work.