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Napa Cabbage Kimchi

This classic recipe from chef David Chang's "Momofuku" cookbook is used to make his Brussels Sprouts with Kimchi Puree and Bacon dish.

  • Yield: Makes 1 to 1 1/2 quarts
Napa Cabbage Kimchi

Source: The Martha Stewart Show, January Winter 2009

Ingredients

  • 1 small to medium head Napa cabbage, discolored or loose outer leaves discarded
  • 2 tablespoons coarse salt
  • 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 20 cloves garlic, minced
  • 20 slices peeled fresh ginger, minced
  • 1/2 cup kochukaru (Korean chile powder)
  • 1/4 cup fish sauce
  • 1/2 cup usukuchi (light soy sauce)
  • 2 teaspoons jarred salted shrimp
  • 1/2 cup (1-inch) scallion pieces
  • 1/2 cup julienned carrots

Directions

  1. Halve cabbage lengthwise. Cut halves crosswise into 1-inch-wide pieces. In a large bowl, toss cabbage with salt and 2 tablespoons sugar. Transfer to refrigerator and let stand overnight.

  2. In a large bowl, combine garlic, ginger, kochukaru, fish sauce, usukuchi, shrimp, and remaining 1/2 cup sugar. If mixture is very thick, add water, 1/3 cup at a time, until consistency is just thicker than a creamy salad dressing. Stir in scallions and carrots.

  3. Drain cabbage and add to bowl with garlic mixture. Cover and transfer to refrigerator for at least 24 hours. It is best when kept refrigerated for 2 weeks but will keep refrigerated for up to 1 month.

Reviews (2)

  • colina999 5 Apr, 2013

    I assume in the first step the napa cabbage is supposed to be submerged in water with the sugar and salt? It doesn't say water, but all other recipes I have seen suggest water.

  • icancho 29 Jan, 2009

    I am a Korean female living in Italy. Some ingredients' dosage seems not correct. And I have never put carrot and soy sauce for napa cabbage Kimchi.... For ginger, I used to smashing it, instead of peeling.

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