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Three Ways to Customize a Wool Blanket

Martha Stewart Living, November 2010

Create a cozy companion to your sofa or bed that fits your exact color -- and texture -- specifications. Have a length of your favorite woolly fabric cut (50 by 60 inches for a small throw; 60 by 90 inches for a large one); then customize the edges.

Fringe Effect
Pull out 1 to 1 1/2 inches of the weave on each end of the cut fabric with your fingers. The looser and fuzzier the textile, the easier it will be to separate the weave and make the fringe. Wool-mohair blends (such as the one shown here) work best. Cashmere is another good choice for this technique.

All Stitched Up
To finish the edge with a blanket stitch, roll each edge 1 inch twice, and pin. Then, using yarn or floss in a contrasting color, sew around the folded loop of fabric, removing the pins as you go. Learn more about the blanket stitch.

Braided Beauty
Trim a 4-inch square from each corner of a wool or fleece fabric. Fold each edge of throw over 2 inches; stitch along each edge, creating tubes. Using chalk, mark notches every 3/4 inch along each tube. Cut each notch down to the stitch line, creating loops. Starting in the middle of 1 side, slip 1 loop over the loop next to it. Then take that loop, and slip it over the one next to it. Continue around perimeter. At the end, cut the last loop open at 1 side of the stitch line, thread it through the first loop, and hand-sew shut.

Sources: Mohair/wool, 57 inches wide, nyelegantfabrics.com; Cashmere/wool/nylon, 54 inches wide, nyelegantfabrics.com;Wool melton, 60 inches wide, nyelegantfabrics.com

 

Comments (2)

  • Nan 9 Aug, 2012

    Help! I want to make the braided edge, but just don't get the directions :-( Can someone from MS.com enhance the directions or adda photo? Alternatively - have any readers tried this?

  • nanagramms3 17 Mar, 2012

    Sometimes a photo or two with the instructions would make it easier to understand what you are talking about.