No Thanks
Let

Keep In Touch With MarthaStewart.com

Sign up and we'll send inspiration straight to you.

Martha Stewart takes your privacy seriously. To learn more, please read our Privacy Policy.

  1. It's Crudite Season

    Hide

    Create an hors d'oeuvre centerpiece that recalls a vegetable patch. Buy a large, deep galvanized-metal planter from a garden-supply center, line the bottom with sprouts, and pour in enough water to moisten them. Arrange vegetables, such as cherry tomatoes, carrots, radishes, asparagus, and cauliflower, in sections inside the container, varying the colors. Serve immediately with herb dip, or cover with moist paper towels and refrigerate up to 2 hours.

    Herb Dip Recipe

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, March 2008
    More Bright Ideas
  2. A Year of Flowers: August

    Hide

    When a vessel is this distinctive, its form and color practically dictate what kinds of displays to create. Martha's blue-glazed ceramic shell evokes summer at the beach, a time and place indelibly associated with billowing hydrangeas. Luxuriant cuttings from three cultivars, along with some leaves, supply the structure of this design. Airy pink gomphrena and white Cimicifuga cap the sea foam with spray.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living
  3. A Year of Flowers: April

    Hide

    Unless they're down on hands and knees for an outdoor egg hunt, people tend to overlook the exquisite shapes and tones of minuscule spring flowers. Give these plants the close-up they deserve by using eggcups as vases, which can hold pink lilies of the valley, species tulips, grape hyacinths, narcissus, violets, pansies, bleeding-heart leaves, and other small wonders. Try several cups on a tray for an Easter centerpiece or a single one to cheer up a desk or a bureau.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living
  4. A Year of Flowers: June

    Hide

    At this time of year, it's tempting to create an everything-in-the-vase display that rivals perennial borders at their June peak. But indoors, simpler can be better. Consider combining just a couple of fine specimens: the amazing varieties of one flower, such as alliums, and the gorgeous foliage of another, such as hosta. We used a fluted white vase to focus attention on subtle color harmonies and contrasting silhouettes. On a practical note, alliums need frequent water changes, so refill the vase daily.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living
  5. Packing Leftovers

    Hide

    Leftovers are one of the best parts of Thanksgiving, so pack them with style as you send guests home with food. 

    Purchase takeout cartons in multiple sizes, along with adhesive labels to note what's inside each. At the end of the meal, you won't have to scurry to find the right containers and matching lids -- and guests won't need to return any dishes.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, November 2008
  6. Passover Plates

    Hide

    If you're expecting numerous guests for the holiday dinner and have only one seder plate, create one or two extras so everyone around the table can participate. Arrange five elegant saucers or small bowls on a large plate that matches them, and then use the small dishes to display each of the symbolic foods.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, April 2008
  7. More Entertaining Ideas