advertisement

advertisement

No Thanks
Let
Keep In Touch With MarthaStewart.com

Sign up and we'll send inspiration straight to you.

Martha Stewart takes your privacy seriously. To learn more, please read our Privacy Policy.

  1. It's Crudite Season

    Hide

    Create an hors d'oeuvre centerpiece that recalls a vegetable patch. Buy a large, deep galvanized-metal planter from a garden-supply center, line the bottom with sprouts, and pour in enough water to moisten them. Arrange vegetables, such as cherry tomatoes, carrots, radishes, asparagus, and cauliflower, in sections inside the container, varying the colors. Serve immediately with herb dip, or cover with moist paper towels and refrigerate up to 2 hours.

    Herb Dip Recipe

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, March 2008
    More Bright Ideas
  2. A Year of Flowers: January

    Hide

    Sweet fragrances and sunrise colors fill this vase with bright promise for the New Year. Kumquats and limes evoke a tropical getaway, as do lush blossoms of phalaenopsis orchids (available at many supermarkets). The perfumes of paperwhite narcissus and jasmine are a surefire pick-me-up. As you make the arrangement, insert the sturdy citrus branches before adding the delicate flower stems. For a final touch, let some jasmine trail down the side.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living
  3. Good Thing

    From Tree to Table

    Hide

    Shake things up with a dish that's distinctive but doesn't abandon traditional flavors: fall-foliage lasagna. The secret? Pasta colored with beet and carrot puree, and shaped with cookie cutters.

    Your caterer can incorporate these tricks into her recipe; we layered fresh ricotta cheese between beet and carrot pastas, which were cooked, then sauteed in -- and drizzled with -- a brown-butter and sage sauce. The combination is hard to, ahem, beet.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Weddings, Fall 2009
  4. Good Thing

    Rings True

    Hide

    You're not the type to have a closet full of neutrals. Wouldn't it be great if your engagement ring reflected your penchant for color? Candy-hued diamonds have figured heavily in famous engagements of late (think Mariah Carey's rose-tinted rock and Heidi Klum's canary-yellow beauty), but they hold a prehistoric appeal. Long before the stones were ready to grace your finger, they blushed pink or glowed gold far beneath the earth's surface, as elements like nitrogen worked their magic. The stunning results, courtesy of Father Time and Mother Nature.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Weddings
  5. Good Thing

    Make a Statement

    Hide

    Many brides save their bouquets, but dried flowers can look a tad Miss Havisham. Instead, turn the ribbon used for the stems into a keepsake by having your vows printed on it. Email a JPG image of calligraphed or typed text to Masterstroke Canada; they'll put the words onto ribbon using a thermal-transfer technique.

    Resources

    Calligraphy, John DeCollibus, beyondwordsscript.com. Bouquet, Laura Seita.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Weddings
  6. Good Thing

    Read It and Weep

    Hide

    Guests prone to waterworks at weddings could use one of these: a ceremony program that doubles as a tissue cache. 

    To make the petite pocket, tuck a tissue or two inside a piece of paper that folds over twice to become a small, sideless envelope. (Use decorative scissors to trim the edges of the flap.) Then, glue or tape the envelope to the program. True, not everyone is going to cry during the vows, but it's a charming way to dry the joyful tears of those who do. 

    Scalloped "z-card" in lavelite, Envelopments.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Weddings
  7. More Entertaining Ideas