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  1. Fourth of July Cupcakes

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    They may not sparkle or explode, but these cupcakes are just the thing for your Fourth of July celebration. Bake cupcakes in foil cups, spread them generously with white frosting, and decorate with fresh blueberries and raspberries.

     

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, July/August 1996
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  2. Pasta Skeletons

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    Kids can bone up on anatomy and create a fun Halloween decoration at the same time when they make a skeleton out of noodles. With an illustration of a skeleton as a guide, they just need lots of dried pasta, white glue, and construction paper to assemble the pictures. We snapped some of the pasta in half and used alphabet-soup noodles to make labels.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Kids, Volume 15 2004
  3. Asparagus

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    Asparagus is best cooked the day it's purchased, but it can be kept in the refrigerator for up to five days in one of the following ways: Wrap the bottoms of the stalks in a damp paper towel, and place in a paper bag; store in crisper. Or stand the bundled stalks in a bowl with about an inch of water.

    Although many people believe that thinner asparagus spears are more tender than thicker ones, thick spears are actually just as tender. If the asparagus stems are tough, remove the outer layer with a vegetable peeler.

    Source
    Everyday Food, Volume 9 March/April 2003
  4. Citrus Trick

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    To get every last drop from an overly firm lemon or lime, zap it in the microwave for 10 seconds. The heat will soften the fruit, releasing its liquid. Slice it in two. Using one hand, squeeze half (cut side against your palm) over a bowl. The seeds will collect in your hand as the juice flows into the dish.

     

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, June 2006
  5. What Is Dulce de Leche?

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    The name of this caramel-like confection, from Argentina and Uruguay, loosely translates to "milk candy": In a traditional process, sugar and milk are cooked over low heat for hours, until the mixture becomes thick and golden. Make your own dulce de leche, or find it in the international aisle or a Latin-foods market. It's great spread on toast, drizzled over tropical fruit such as mango, used as a dip for apple slices, or whipped into butter and spread on cornbread.

    Source
    Everyday Food, November 2010
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