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  1. Pots of All Stripes

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    Here's an easy way to give new life to old terra-cotta pots you have around the shed: Paint them to create coordinating stripes. Using masking tape in various widths, mark a simple striped design on the pot. In a well-ventilated area, spray the exterior and the rim (and any accompanying saucers) with weatherproof spray paint; let dry completely. Peel off tape.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, February 2008
    More Bright Ideas
  2. Surprising Garden Pots: Chimney Pots

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    These stately pedestals, made to fit over a chimney's flue, help prevent drafts and add a distinctive note to rooftops. Though pricey, they also make a grand spot to prop up plants. Choose antique or new pots -- find the latter at masonry yards -- and place a plastic pot liner inside each. (For fit, you may need to trim top of liner, then cut down the side and overlap edges.) We filled ours with purple cordylines, silver tradescantia, and rex begonia vine (Cissus discolor).

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, March 2006
  3. Wallpapered Shelves

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    Add a splash of personality to a lackluster work space by covering plain floating bookshelves with wallpaper. Measure the shelf, and cut the wallpaper slightly longer than shelf and wide enough to wrap around it with an overlap. Use wallpaper paste to affix the wallpaper to the shelf, pasting one side at a time. Cut slits into excess paper at ends, forming flaps; fold down, and affix with paste. Let dry completely, and hang shelves as usual.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, February 2008
  4. By A Thread

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    Sometimes the perfect thread for a sewing project comes on a spool that's imperfectly sized for your sewing machine. The solution: Place the spool in a heavy mug, and position it on your work surface directly underneath the spool pin. Take hold of the thread end, and hook it over the spool pin before threading it into the machine as usual (the thread should form a 90-degree angle); the thread will unravel smoothly as you work.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, March 2008
  5. Basic First-Aid Kit

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    When you need first-aid supplies most, you're usually not in the best frame of mind to search for them. A well-stocked first-aid kit keeps the items you need easy to find. Bandages, adhesive tape, gauze, and scissors are useful. To clean wounds, keep hydrogen peroxide or isopropyl alcohol (and cotton balls or swabs to apply it) on hand as well as antibiotic ointment (check expiration date). A first-aid kit is also a good place to store pain relievers.

    Source
    Organizing Good Things 2004
  6. Baking Sheet Boot Trays

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    Rectangular baking sheets make perfect receptacles for wet shoes and boots. The pans move easily in and out of cubbyholes, taking their contents out of the way. Once the shoes are dry, the pans can be washed and replaced.

    Source
    Organizing Good Things 2005
  7. More Home & Garden Ideas