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Project

Basic First-Aid Kit

Introduction

When you need first-aid supplies most, you're usually not in the best frame of mind to search for them. A well-stocked first-aid kit keeps the items you need easy to find. Bandages, adhesive tape, gauze, and scissors are useful. To clean wounds, keep hydrogen peroxide or isopropyl alcohol (and cotton balls or swabs to apply it) on hand as well as antibiotic ointment (check expiration date). A first-aid kit is also a good place to store pain relievers.

Source
Organizing Good Things 2004

Reviews (33)

  • 22 Aug, 2012

    Survival kit is something that for some reason people like to either overlook or postpone buying. It's weird, however I did that myself until I read another great article and a video on Martha Stewart. It's unbelievable, but I'd spend on junk everyday without a second thought, but when it comes to my own safety, lol! I believe people should have kits everywhere they are like at home and a separate one in the car. Check out www.SurvivaKit.com they got it.

  • 13 Aug, 2012

    I'm putting together a kit right now for my daughter to take to college with her. I' m adding aspirin, antacids,pink bismuth, benadryl and imodium all in pill form. It's easy to pack. I put it in a small tackle box, done.

  • 12 Aug, 2012

    Oh...PS if you are married don't forget the hubby's garage or workshop however they need bigger kits! Also a kit in the 4 wheeler and the motorcycle! I also have kits in the laundryroom,mudroom and my sewingroom! So don't overlook other rooms!

  • 12 Aug, 2012

    When the children were little I kept a small first aid kit in the diaper bag, after a car accident I now always keep a small kit in the glove box with emergency numbers in it and one larger kit in the trunk...[ FYI: you can't always get to the glove box or maybe the trunk after an accident] . I also use kits at deer camp and the cabin from beprepared.com along with their auto kit...check it out.

  • 12 Aug, 2012

    I just went to the dr. last week for a dog bite and they said they don't reccomend using peroxide or alcohol anymore because it kills the tissue. They want you to use soap and water only.

  • 12 Aug, 2012

    Please do not forget disposable gloves! This is a major safety issue.

  • 12 Aug, 2012

    The picture has garden pots in it because they used the same picture for a garden first aid kit a little while ago.

  • 15 Jan, 2011

    Just curious as to why gardening pots are pictured with the first aid supplies

  • 28 Aug, 2010

    The latest medical recommendations are NOT to use Hydrogen Poroxide as an anti-bacterial unless the wound is deep. It apparently actually causes cell damage. It is recommended for deep wounds as it is an oxegenator. A better choice for shallow cuts or surface abrasions is Bactine or Neosporen.

  • 27 Aug, 2010

    Something as basic as a first aid kit is often overlooked. you don't realize you need one or are out of a product until you need it. For years, I have given first aid kits as presents for the holidays. They make great gifts. I have been buying first aid kit from the same company that I had purchased survival kits form and have been very happy with the quality of the kits. The company I use is at www.survivalkitsonline.com. They have been a very good resource for all types of items.

  • 27 Aug, 2010

    Go to the 99 cent store and save price woundage. Good to see some sense of humor finally on this website. Thanks ambervee and persay.

  • 27 Aug, 2010

    Always take a first aid kit of some sort with you in your carry-on at the airport. I found out the hard way that they do not have first aid kits ANYWHERE in case of emergency. They'll only call 911. And, none of the newstands had any bandaids or first aid kits that day. I had to make do with a cotton ball from my makeup kit and some scotch tape from the desk for a pretty nasty and deep cut.

  • 27 Aug, 2010

    Thanks, ambervee and persay - you made my day!!
    I was disappointed when I came here since I was expecting a checklist of what you should have, not a few vague suggestions. I already knew that bandaids, etc were 'useful' to have in a first aid kit.

  • 27 Aug, 2010

    A few more nice-to-haves in a first aid kit. ALOE VERA GEL for sunburn. DRY SUNBLOCK. LIQUID SKIN - So much better than paper or plastic bandasges - I never buy them anymore.

  • 27 Aug, 2010

    The point of the nearby garden supplies MAY be to show that while gardening, one may cut a finger or something and need the first aid kit.

  • 27 Aug, 2010

    I think the flower seeds are to plant inside a wound. That way everyone can have a little bit of sunshiny goodness growing inside them.

  • 27 Aug, 2010

    @cottagegarden, I think the pots are a good way to hide the wooden stake so that vampires don't know you are prepared for them too. Beyond that, stay away from planting snapping dragons. ;)

  • 27 Aug, 2010

    @cottagegarden, I think the pots are a good way to hide the wooden stake so that vampires don't know you are prepared for them too. Beyond that, stay away from planting snapping dragons. ;)

  • 27 Aug, 2010

    @cottagegarden, I think the pots are a good way to hide the wooden stake so that vampires don't know you are prepared for them too. Beyond that, stay away from planting snapping dragons. ;)

  • 27 Aug, 2010

    What do flower pots and seeds have to do with a first aid kit? Just askin'......

  • 9 Nov, 2008

    An indisposable ointment is arnica - I love my Boiron brand Arnica (the GEL, not cream) because it's parabe-free. It's the perfect go-to for bumps and bruises, which happen more often than anything else with two kids around!

  • 5 Nov, 2008

    Target has small first aide kits in their band-aide aisle

  • 5 Nov, 2008

    i made first aid kits using disposable items made by redcross such as alcohol pads, hand sanitizer, bandaids and lotion (just incase a ring gets stuck on a swollen finger) and we store it in a Travel case for bar soap. it's small yet roomy

  • 5 Nov, 2008

    I made first aid kits with my 2 daughter (ages 10

  • 4 Nov, 2008

    The divided tote would be ideal for a first aid kit for gardeners, stocked with tweezers, peroxide, Band-Aids, etc., as well as a bottle of crazy glue for minor punctures from rose bushes or other thorny plants.

  • 4 Nov, 2008

    What else is good to put in the first aid gift bag?

  • 4 Nov, 2008

    I keep a small kit in a ziplock bag in the glove box of the cars.

  • 4 Nov, 2008

    FYI: if you dilute peroxide with a little warm tap water, you still get the great antiseptic action, without the harsh sting. (We use 1/2 and 1/2 in our physician office)

  • 4 Nov, 2008

    I gave family members first aid kits for Christmas a couple of years ago. You can find inexpensive kits at the drug store or WalMart and then just refill as you need. Everyone loved them. It's something you don't often think of buying for yourself.

  • 4 Nov, 2008

    I also include a bee sting remedy, special burn bandages, liquid bandages, Band-Aid's hurt free antiseptic wash, an eye wash solution and a temporary dental filling kit in my kit as well.

  • 4 Nov, 2008

    There is a great wound cleaner I keep in the baggie. It is a spray saline solution. Doesn't seem to sting, will clean the wound (skinned knees!) with minimal skin cell damage (h peroxide kills germs AND the skin cells), and is sterile.
    Very handy.

  • 4 Nov, 2008

    I know all you mom's will keep your first aid things up out of the way of small children. Also prescription meds in a safe place where teens won't be tempted. I had one child out of four to chew some tablets when he was very small. We were lucky it was only a small amt. and everything turned out all right. Love this sight.

  • 4 Nov, 2008

    My kit is not pretty looking but very functional. I put my supplies in ziplocky type plastic baggies - oral pain relievers in one, ointments in another, swabs and cotton in another etc. Then the all go in a large baggie together.
    Benefits: EASY to see, EASY to grab and go (like on a hike or camping), EASY to keep clean!