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  1. Basic First-Aid Kit

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    When you need first-aid supplies most, you're usually not in the best frame of mind to search for them. A well-stocked first-aid kit keeps the items you need easy to find. Bandages, adhesive tape, gauze, and scissors are useful. To clean wounds, keep hydrogen peroxide or isopropyl alcohol (and cotton balls or swabs to apply it) on hand as well as antibiotic ointment (check expiration date). A first-aid kit is also a good place to store pain relievers.

    Source
    Organizing Good Things 2004
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  2. Dust Jackets

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    Twenty-inch cloth napkins (or same-size squares of fabric) become protective covers for coats and vests that don't need to be stored in garment bags. Each is pierced in the center and reinforced with a grommet to slide over a hanger.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, January 2009
  3. Our Favorite Gardening Gear

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    After decades of weeding, wading, and planting, we dig these work shoes the most. 

    From top: breathable waterproof boots, sturdy clogs with removable foot beds, and all-purpose boots for cold weather. To protect hands, nothing beats Mud's nonslip, machine-washable gloves. 

    Hoser Classic Work Boots $95, muckbootcompany.com; Super-Birki Clogs $79, birki.us; Blundstone 500 $150, zappos.com; the original $6 per pair, by Mud, littlesgoodgloves.com

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, April 2010
  4. Kitchen Tip: Keeping Burners Splatter-Free

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    Here's an easy way to protect the other burners on your stovetop when frying or sauteing.

    Place a rimmed baking sheet upside down over nearby burners to shield them from splatters, which are often hard to clean up. Then simply wash the sheet.

    Source
    Everyday Food, June 2004
  5. Garden-Shed Crate Cabinets

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    Create custom cabinetry in your garden shed with vintage wine crates from flea markets or online auctions. Stack them horizontally and vertically, using some as bases to vary heights. Once you've established a layout, connect crates with wood screws and collars near the corners. Use cup hooks to hang smaller items, such as trowels, funnels, and scissors. If your need for storage grows, you can easily reconfigure the system.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, March 2009
  6. Shake Away Pests

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    Put a kitchen shaker to work in your garden; its a great tool for dispersing horticultural-grade diatomaceous earth. This nontoxic pesticide, which has sharp edges that kill slugs and bugs without chemicals, can be difficult to spread. But a shaker lets you dust an even ring on soil around plants.

    Source
    Martha Stewart Living, June 2009
  7. More Home & Garden Ideas