No Thanks
Let

Keep In Touch With MarthaStewart.com

Sign up and we'll send inspiration straight to you.

Martha Stewart takes your privacy seriously. To learn more, please read our Privacy Policy.

Keeping Lampshades Clean

Martha Stewart Living, November 2009

Here's a bright idea: Keep your fabric lampshades dust-free with an adhesive lint roller. Hold the shade steady, and pass the roller over the exterior.

Comments (16)

  • 4 Apr, 2011

    For pleated shades I start with a can of compressed air. Taking the shade outside and starting at the top of the shade working down, I spray air running the nozzle along the valley of each pleat the entire the length (keeping the air can upright) . If the shade is very tall I squirt the air in short bursts.

  • 4 Apr, 2011

    I learned the lesson the hard way ... shade got yucky -- so I threw it away. ARRGH!!

    NEVER ever do that! It's the FRAME of the shade that is of the UTMOST importance -- the frame can be refabric'd - if you like the lamp itself, have new fabric put on the frame. Chances are you will rarely find a new shade that will fit your lamp or your colors, etc.

    I was lucky -- the same shop was still in business and they had 2 lampshades that fit my antique lamps.

  • 4 Apr, 2011

    I also prefer a clean paint brush for cleaning my lamp shades and blinds. I also mix a little bleach with water in a spray bottle and it takes away water marks that have been on old lamp shades for years.

  • 4 Apr, 2011

    I've used the Mr. Clean sponge a few times, it works great on smuges, and even cleaned dried blood on one I was sure was headed for the dusfbin

  • 4 Apr, 2011

    I use a paint brush for very dusty fabric shades. Of course, I do this procedure out of doors.

  • 4 Apr, 2011

    What is a good way to clean pleated lampshades?
    Its so time consuming for me.
    Bekagram

  • 19 May, 2010

    I've been doing ths for years. Works great

  • 18 May, 2010

    I used this tip last winter to salvage my mother's lampshades. She's not what you would call a great housekeeper, and her lampshades hadn't been cleaned in years. I would have thrown them out, but they're a hard-to-find size and color, so I tried this as a last-ditch effort. Worked like a charm! They went from trash to like-new in 60 seconds!

  • 17 May, 2010

    brilliant idea!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • 17 May, 2010

    Sorry Martha... I don't like the adhesive roller idea either. All my lampshades are pleated. I take them outside and brush them thoroughly with a clean 4-inch paintbrush used exclusively for dusting. Does a good job on both interior and exterior. Also useful for dusting all other kinds of things with 'odd' shapes for which the normal dustcloth just doesn't work as well.

  • 17 May, 2010

    I use the Pxxxxx multi-surface wipes. They don't damage the color or surface but do a good job of cleaning in the pleats, etc.

  • 17 May, 2010

    Just to revisit the lint roller idea: I don't like it because it leaves a slight microscopic stickiness that will attract more dust and dirt after use. I would prefer to use the soft brush upholstery attachment on my Miele vacuum or the compressed air idea.

  • 17 May, 2010

    JOANN1. I ALSO HAVE A PLEATED LALMP SHADE. I HAVE USED A TOOTHBRUSH AND ALSO COMPRESSED AIR (IN THE CAN, THE ONE USED FOR KEYBOARDS AND THE LIKE) BOTH WORK WELL.. THE VERY THIN STRAW THAT COMES WITH THE COMPRESSED AIR CAN REALLY GETS IN BETWEEN THE PLEATS VERY WELL. HOPE THIS HELPS!

  • 17 May, 2010

    I use a dust-buster or vacuum my pleated lampshades

  • 17 May, 2010

    I use a round pastry brush with soft bristles. I take the shade outside and brush gently down and between the pleats.

  • 17 May, 2010

    Good suggestion. Some of my lampshades are pleated. Any good way to clean them?